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Thread: Songs well-fitted for the Banjo Uke?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    NH
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    Martin OXK Soprano
    Kamaka HF3 Tenor
    Eastman EU3C Concert
    Martin S1
    Martin T1K

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Sumter County, FL
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    "Do you know what it means to miss New Orleangs" is my banjo-uke warm-up piece. Otherwise, just about everything gets BU time.
    https://youtu.be/Xhkxy3ei8os
    https://youtu.be/5pafQdX0jYg
    Last edited by SteveZ; 02-12-2019 at 03:28 AM.
    ...SteveZ

    Ukuleles: Martin T1K (T), Oscar Schmidt OU28T (T8), Lanikai LU-6 (T6), RISA Solid (C), Effin UkeStart (C), Flea (S)
    Banjo-Ukes: Duke 10 (T), Lanikai LB6-S (S)
    Tenor Guitars: Martin TEN515, Blueridge BR-40T
    Tenor Banjo: Deering Goodtime 17-Fret
    Mandolin: Burgess (#7)

    Ukuleles, Guitars & Banjo tuned CGDA, Banjo-Ukes tuned Reentrant C CGDA, Mandolin tuned GDAE

    The inventory is always in some flux, but that's part of the fun.

  3. #13
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    Aug 2009
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    New York
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    Sloop John B & This Land is your Land work really well on the Banjo Uke

  4. #14
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    Jul 2012
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    When a "Train" song comes up in one of my music books, I reach for my banjolele. Think, City of New Orleans and Freight Train, among others. Of course, any Stephen Foster song would without a banjo should be a federal crime.

  5. #15
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    Feb 2012
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    St. Louis, MO, USA
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    LOL, Ukuleles Aren't Allowed in Bluegrass.
    Kathryn

  6. #16
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    Mar 2018
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    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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    Quote Originally Posted by TobyDog View Post
    St James Infirmary

    A group I belong to is working on it, and one fellow has a banjo uke - it sounds great.
    Thanks for pointing this out - a future project for my banjo!
    _________

    Loquax autem mutus es

    1920s Martin Style 2
    Anuenue Moon Bird Tenor
    Kanile'a K1T
    Pono Tenor Pro Classic (Macassar and Cedar)
    1923 Gibson tenor trap door banjo (ukefied)
    Kiwaya KSU-1L (long neck soprano)
    Flight TUS-35

  7. #17
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    Jul 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain-janeway View Post
    Hmmm.... I'm trying to teach myself "Dueling Banjos"
    Yes! It's not very hard. I can play the slow introductory part, but I'm not going to attempt the fast section. I watched that part of the movie recently - the duet was too long and boring. I guess I had remembered it differently.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!

  8. #18
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    Jul 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by kkimura View Post
    Very nice.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    Yes! It's not very hard. I can play the slow introductory part, but I'm not going to attempt the fast section. I watched that part of the movie recently - the duet was too long and boring. I guess I had remembered it differently.
    Sounds pretty good on the new banjo uke!

  10. #20
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    Jul 2011
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    Chicago
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    Quote Originally Posted by lfoo6952 View Post
    I don't know how old you are but back in the 60's, "Mrs. Brown You've Got a Lovely Daughter" by the Herman's Hermits might be a good one to try. It was played on a banjo.
    Pretty much anything recorded by Herman's Hermits works nicely on banjo uke. A lot of the British Invasion music-hall new Edwardian stuff. If the lead singer had mod hair and wore a ruffled shirt (I'm thinking of you, Davy Jones) it loves a banjo uke. I get by with a little help from my friends when I'm 64.

    Most of the Tin Pan Alley songs of the 20s and 30s sound good on banjo uke. When the red red robin comes bob-bob-bobbin. Dixieland and bluegrass, of course. Plus anything you might expect to hear played on a lonely front porch in the Mississippi delta. Tishomingo Blues.

    In fact, and this is for the OP and all the rest of us on this thread, almost anything can be made to sound good on a banjo uke. It doesn't have to be all yowza yowza yowza! The trick with a banjo uke is to listen and adjust your playing accordingly, not just bash away with a loud strum. Think of Kermit on his log, strumming with a light hand and a little fingerpicking, nice and relaxed and wistful. :-)

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