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Thread: Playing a B sharp 6

  1. #1
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    Default Playing a B sharp 6

    Hi all.

    I'm embarking on learning the Lyle Ritz version of Fly me To the Moon and I've got a question about one of the chords.

    How would you play a B sharp 6 (or similar chord shape)?

    In tab it's 5353

    Aaron from the Ukulele Site plays it with a finger for each fret while my son (who's a guitar player in his fourth year of a degree in contemporary music) is saying to play it with the third fret barred with the ring and pointer fingers on the two strings at the 5th.

    The chord is at the 7 second mark in this video.



    Thanks for your help!
    Soprano: Maui Music Pre-fire SK (Koa), Ohana SK-38 (Mahogany)
    Concert: Barron River (Curly Maple)
    Tenor: Pono PKT-2E (Koa)

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubulele View Post
    I mostly play it like Aaron, though choose whichever way works best for YOU (and whichever way connects most naturally with the preceding or following chord).

    Also, always "spell" such things starting from the 4th string: 3535 rather than 5353. Otherwise, you just confuse others.
    No worries. Thanks and sorry I wrote the chord out wrong. I've been experimenting today and I think Aaron's way is the way for me as well. Cheers!
    Soprano: Maui Music Pre-fire SK (Koa), Ohana SK-38 (Mahogany)
    Concert: Barron River (Curly Maple)
    Tenor: Pono PKT-2E (Koa)

  3. #3
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    I think the chord in question is Bb6, B sharp being C. This being an english forum. So it is B flat with the 6th. The 3535 fingering gives the lowest Bb in low G tuning.
    Regarding notes Bb6 = Gm7, so the chord has 2 names. You always have the relationship that the minor 7th chord root is 3 half steps lower than the major 6th chords's root, so easy to find if you know the other's fingering.

    One other way to finger it and getting lower voicing in re-entrant uke is 0211.

    If you want B6, it is either from lowest form 1322 or 4646.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 02-17-2019 at 12:46 AM.

  4. #4
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    I am learning another Lyle Ritz arrangement of Edelweiss which uses the same chord and I have been playing it as Aaron does in the video. I think it would be more difficult to play it as a barre.

    Andy

  5. #5
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    I always play chords of this type (viz., a F# m7) by fretting the higher fret, in this case the fifth, with my pinky and ring fingers and I barre the lower fret, the third in this case, with my index. I don't know if it is easier or not than some other technique. It is just what I have always used and what now is second nature to me.

  6. #6
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    Thanks all.

    With a bit more practice I'm finding Aarons way is easier for me to change to/from but definitely see it as being something that each person works out the best for them.
    Soprano: Maui Music Pre-fire SK (Koa), Ohana SK-38 (Mahogany)
    Concert: Barron River (Curly Maple)
    Tenor: Pono PKT-2E (Koa)

  7. #7
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    I've played it both ways depending on the transitions to and from it. Either way, it's a horrible chord to play.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    I always play chords of this type (viz., a F# m7) by fretting the higher fret, in this case the fifth, with my pinky and ring fingers and I barre the lower fret, the third in this case, with my index. I don't know if it is easier or not than some other technique. It is just what I have always used and what now is second nature to me.
    That is how I would do it too, but what feels natural to us may feel awkward to others. I also recommend a 'guide finger' approach where you aim one finger at the desired upper fret and have your other fingers fall into place behind it. Helps with fast chord changes.
    Laurence

    Martin T-1 Tenor
    YT Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/SeattleUke

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    I always play chords of this type (viz., a F# m7) by fretting the higher fret, in this case the fifth, with my pinky and ring fingers and I barre the lower fret, the third in this case, with my index. I don't know if it is easier or not than some other technique. It is just what I have always used and what now is second nature to me.
    I too have always fingered it same way as you, it is just I today noticed that I'm often late trying to fit the barre and the 3rd and 4th fingers for the first strum beat. My analysis is that the barre restricts the chord forming other fingers somewhat. Whereas the four finger hold is not really that difficult, but rather natural. So I've decided to learn it instead. Will see how it goes.

    It is just the diminished 7th chord fingering with 3rd and 4th fingers a fret higher.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 03-14-2019 at 03:11 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarmo_S View Post
    I too have always fingered it same way as you, it is just I today noticed that I'm often late trying to fit the barre and the 3rd and 4th fingers for the first strum beat. My analysis is that the barre restricts the chord forming other fingers somewhat. Whereas the four finger hold is not really that difficult, but rather natural. So I've decided to learn it instead. Will see how it goes.

    It is just the diminished 7th chord fingering with 3rd and 4th fingers a fret higher.
    I tend to place the fingers first and then slap the barre down. I like the barre-version because it is just a wider dim7. Also it seems to work with what I play. For example, this morning I was strumming around with a blues progression in E. The turnaround goes:

    B7
    B7sus4
    C7
    F#m7
    B7
    E

    in that ii V I turnaround, I transition from the F#m7 to the B7 by just moving the fingers under the barre.

    Lastly, I find the stretch on the four-fingered version of this chord very awkward, but good luck with it. It undoubtably will pay great dividends in certain contexts. Moreover, with every chord that we master, that is one step closer to musical nirvana.

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