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Thread: Pretty Songs for Strumming

  1. #1

    Default Pretty Songs for Strumming

    Most popular beginner songs on youtube are the same 3 or 4 chords using the same d-du-udu pattern. Anyone have any suggestions or links to tutorials that are for beginners, but don't sound like the same thing that you find over and over on youtube?

    I don't mind if the song is old or obscure....I just want to practice something that is beginner moving into intermediate level, and that isn't the same 3 chords repeating over and over.

  2. #2
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    Try arpeggiating the chords - i.e. picking one string at a time with your fingers.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  3. #3
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    Try some of the easier tin pan alley songs with compelling melodies...a few recommendations are:

    April Showers
    Button Up Your Overcoat
    Halfway to Heaven
    My Blue Heaven
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  4. #4
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    Try looking up "everybodys talking at me"

    https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/tab..._chords_768106

    It is basically D, E7 and A7 over and over.
    But the D chord is played going between D, Dmaj7, D7 and D6. Really easy, you just lift some fingers, but it adds a lot.

    D Dmaj7 D7 D6
    5 4. 3. 2
    2 2. 2. 2
    2. 2. 2. 2
    2 2. 2. 2
    Ohana SK30M mahogany super-soprano, Cort UKEBWCOP Blackwood concert, Anuenue African Mahogany Tenor, Fluke Koa Tenor, Hora M1176 spruce Tenor

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by UkingViking View Post
    Try looking up "everybodys talking at me" . . . the D chord is played going between D, Dmaj7, D7 and D6. Really easy, you just lift some fingers, but it adds a lot.
    I second UkingViking's recommendation; that type of movement on a home chord is common in the American songbook. Two immediate examples that spring to mind are "Vincent" and "Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter".
    Last edited by bacchettadavid; 02-27-2019 at 09:19 AM.
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  6. #6
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    the way I learned 'my strumming patterns' was to simply experiment by trying to
    mimic the rhythm and cadence I was hearing. this was back in the 6th grade many,
    many years ago when Rock-n-Roll songs pretty much sounded the same.

    then Christmas came and I tried playing carols and Holiday songs with slightly different
    cadence and rhythm. but I simply kept trying to mimic the sound I heard.

    this is also what I pass along to my students, that rhythm and strumming patterns come
    last (after learning chords and practicing changing chords smoothly without interrupting
    the tempo of the song), and really simply mean mimicking what you are hearing.

    anyway it works for me so that I have about 3-5 strumming patterns I regularly use when
    strumming most songs

    keep uke'in',
    Uncle Rod Higuchi
    ( rohiguchi@seattleschools.org )

    MP3s: http://www.mediafire.com/?50db7nls4o6m6
    Ukulele Boot Camp, FREE Songbook, Holiday, Hawaiian & More: http://ukulelebootcamp.weebly.com
    Crazy G tutorial on YouTube ( uncle rod crazy g )
    pdf file for Crazy G:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/0o6id06c06...20TAB.pdf?dl=0

  7. #7
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    Chad and Jeremy's "A Summer Song" is absolutely lovely to play, and quite easy. The chord progression is F-Am-Bb-C and the strumming rhythm reveals itself the minute you sing the lyrics. I wouldn't call it "beginner" level, but maybe just above beginner. Enjoy!

  8. #8
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    As Uncle Rod said use the strumming pattern to suite the song. Further more learn a number of strumming patterns. One of the most useful things I learned at a ukulele festive workshop was using different strum patterns. The story went "remember when you were first learning songs on uke and all 5 or 6 songs sounded the same", we all laughed. Then he played the same song with 3 different strum patterns and it transformed that song. Also learn about the space or silence in music. The big problem with ukulele is we go dudududud incessantly and it can sound monotonous.
    Currently enjoying these ukuleles : *LdfM tenor, *LfdM 19" super tenor. *LfdM baritone, *I'iwi tenor , *Koolau tenor, *Webber tenor, *Kimo tenor, *Kimo super concert, *Mya Moe baritone, *Kamaka baritone, *Gianinni baritone, *Fred Shields super soprano, *Kala super soprano, *Loprinzi super soprano, *Black bear ULO concert , *Enya X1 concert, *Enya X1 pineapple soprano, *Gretsch tenor, *Korala plastic concert

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownUpDave View Post
    As Uncle Rod said use the strumming pattern to suite the song. Further more learn a number of strumming patterns. One of the most useful things I learned at a ukulele festive workshop was using different strum patterns. The story went "remember when you were first learning songs on uke and all 5 or 6 songs sounded the same", we all laughed. Then he played the same song with 3 different strum patterns and it transformed that song. Also learn about the space or silence in music. The big problem with ukulele is we go dudududud incessantly and it can sound monotonous.
    Can you go dudududu?
    I thought that ukulele can only be strummed d-du-udu.
    With different timing and occasional chucking in stead of strums...
    Or perhaps that is just what I do 80% of the time.
    Ohana SK30M mahogany super-soprano, Cort UKEBWCOP Blackwood concert, Anuenue African Mahogany Tenor, Fluke Koa Tenor, Hora M1176 spruce Tenor

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by UkingViking View Post
    Can you go dudududu?
    I thought that ukulele can only be strummed d-du-udu.
    With different timing and occasional chucking in stead of strums...
    Or perhaps that is just what I do 80% of the time.
    Early on I googled ukulele strum patterns and found a site with probably 10 or 12. I typically use 4 or 5 as my favorites but will explore something different if it helps. It does make learning the song a much longer process. If you think of ukulele in terms of a small 4 string rhythm guitar you can use guitar strum patterns.
    Currently enjoying these ukuleles : *LdfM tenor, *LfdM 19" super tenor. *LfdM baritone, *I'iwi tenor , *Koolau tenor, *Webber tenor, *Kimo tenor, *Kimo super concert, *Mya Moe baritone, *Kamaka baritone, *Gianinni baritone, *Fred Shields super soprano, *Kala super soprano, *Loprinzi super soprano, *Black bear ULO concert , *Enya X1 concert, *Enya X1 pineapple soprano, *Gretsch tenor, *Korala plastic concert

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