Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Changing strings

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Northern US
    Posts
    91

    Default Changing strings

    I bought an amazing Kala Elite from a forum member, and it came with a low G wound string. I really liked the sound. But I struggled with play along with videos because most of them had traditional gCEA tuning instead and my efforts didn't sound the same, which as a newbie, that threw me off. I finally got brave and restrung the uke to gCEA, by myself, which was very unnerving *for me.* I'm sure it's nothing to most but whew, I feel like I survived something...to be done, restrung, and everything went ok. (I think!) To make it more complicated (IMO) the uke strings go through the body, it's not as simple as a tie bridge. Trying to get the strings in and out through the sound hole was a little tough a couple of times. When I am a better player, I look forward to restringing with a low g again.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Devon, UK
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Well done! I’m a newbie to stringed instruments and the idea of restringing is, as you say, unnerving. When my Pono tenor arrived it had a steel wire C string and I found it painful on my fingers and a little harsh sounding, so I took it to a local guitar/ukulele shop (I wasn’t as brave as you). Maybe with more experience with my ukes I might try restringing one myself.
    Kevin
    ________
    Kala KA-BFS Bocote/butterfly Series Soprano
    Ortega Concert
    Pono MTDeluxe Tenor

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    229

    Default

    Congrats on your initiation of changing the strings. There really is not too much that can go wrong assuming you don't drop or damage the ukulele. Messing up the string is cheap, and still hard to do. I took the plunge with my tie-off bridge a few months ago looking on the net and then copying the other strings and was pleasantly surprised that it came out well (with ends still protruding everywhere).

    Kevin, be brave and try changing them yourself next time. And if you mess up, then go to the shop and have them finish the job. It is a great feeling when you do it. This allows the next step of buying multiple string sets to see which sounds best on your uke!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    229

    Default

    duplicate post... having site issues
    Last edited by rainbow21; 04-01-2019 at 01:41 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Posts
    180

    Default

    Congrats! Unless you have mobility/dexterity or vision problems, working the nerve up can be the hardest part!

    Kevin, give it a try next time you need new strings. You can't really do any damage changing strings unless you're egregiously careless (don't stab the soundboard with your scissors, don't drop the ukulele, etc.), and you'll want to change your strings more often than you'll want to pay for the shop to do so.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    738

    Default

    The first unnerving time is done, you are going to enjoy it in the future.
    Only annoying that those damned new strings need to settle in, when you are most courious to hear what they sound like.
    Ohana SK30M mahogany super-soprano, Cort UKEBWCOP Blackwood concert, Anuenue African Mahogany Tenor, Fluke Koa Tenor, Hora M1176 spruce Tenor

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    65

    Default

    So how do you like the high g?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    East Midlands UK
    Posts
    266

    Default

    Well done on your first string change! I find it very easy,especially with nylon based strings,as
    opposed to the 12 steel strings I used to have to change, when I played a 12 string guitar!
    All power and respect to you Concert,Tenor and Baritone players, but Soprano is what does it for me every time! (And my beautiful Sopranino!)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Northern US
    Posts
    91

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slade View Post
    So how do you like the high g?
    I like it, I was so thrown off trying to learn stuff that didn't sound the same as the "teacher" version. I like the low g, but I think it's better for an experienced player who is confident in their results... which I am not! Haha!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    3,641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arcy View Post
    Congrats! Unless you have mobility/dexterity or vision problems, working the nerve up can be the hardest part!
    Isn't that the way it is with a lot of things when it comes to ukuleles. Just working up the nerve to do it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kherome View Post
    I like it, I was so thrown off trying to learn stuff that didn't sound the same as the "teacher" version. I like the low g, but I think it's better for an experienced player who is confident in their results... which I am not! Haha!
    I love re-entrant high g. It is what makes the ukulele different from everything else. I'm glad that you are discovering that. Sometimes it is a challenge, but that is what makes it interesting.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •