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Thread: Fingerpicking question

  1. #1

    Default Fingerpicking question

    I'm just starting fingerpicking and I've learned the Travis Pick and a few other patterns.

    What I seem to be doing without really trying is starting the pattern over at the chord changes rather than just keeping the consistent pattern and letting the chord changes fall where they may. Is this "wrong" or less than ideal? As I said, I seem to be doing this naturally and it sounds pretty good but I have a lurking suspicion that I should be training left and right hands to operate independently.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Just keep it musical to yourself, my advice. Strumming is easy. And rewarding.

    It is just I saw and not really that late some guy posting about fingerpcking, and every note, and I mean every note he could get from that box, it was plucked out. None gentle fingerpicking, it was plain ugly.

    I won't give links. Links the youtube posters will have anyways.

    Just my question was after that video, and it was I think posted in an educational aim. So that fail me.

  3. #3
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    There is no "wrong" if it sounds good to you. Depending on the specific piece and timing and chord voicings keeping the picking pattern consistent or resetting may be better. For getting started keep it simple, keep it accurate, and work on improving one thing at a time.

    Long term you should train yourself to operate independently so you can choose which way to go. Ultimately, you'll get the best results when you can deliberately choose your picking pattern, transitions, chord voicings, etc. rather than always using default settings.

  4. #4
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    I didnt know that there was a "the" travis pick.
    Perhaps I saw the wrong videos, I thought there many variations.

    I am not sure exactly what it is you say you are doing.
    Are you altering the chord changes or the picking?

    You can always make your own interpretation of a song.
    But if you want to learn to play popular songs so people recognize them and possibly play along, I suggest that you make sure the chord changes are with the right timing.
    Then mess around with the picking and strumming and combinations of those just the way it works for you.

    The goal is not to pick the exact same pattern as others, but to make you own variations.
    Last edited by UkingViking; 04-05-2019 at 09:53 AM.
    Ohana SK30M mahogany super-soprano, Cort UKEBWCOP Blackwood concert, Anuenue African Mahogany Tenor, Fluke Koa Tenor, Hora M1176 spruce Tenor

  5. #5
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    Arpeggio Meditations for 'Ukulele by Daniel Ward is killer. Great way to stay on track and practice musically.
    Brad Bordessa

    Check out my new book: Right Hand Technique for 'Ukulele

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arcy View Post
    There is no "wrong" if it sounds good to you. Depending on the specific piece and timing and chord voicings keeping the picking pattern consistent or resetting may be better. For getting started keep it simple, keep it accurate, and work on improving one thing at a time.
    Thanks, that was very helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Bordessa View Post
    Arpeggio Meditations for 'Ukulele by Daniel Ward is killer. Great way to stay on track and practice musically.
    Thanks for this information, it looks fabulous
    Happy to be an Intermediate Newbie, Penny

  8. #8
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    +1 for the Daniel Ward book. I have been using it for about a year and the exercises are great.

    You will develop hand independence as you practice. Ideally you should be a master of the pattern you play with your right hand. If restarting the pattern every chord change is not pleasing you, practice a bit more and eventually you'll be able to keep it going.

  9. #9
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    Aaron Keim’s (see “The Quiet American”) ebooks are very good at teaching fingerpicking.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Ukulele Aerobics by Chad Johnson is quite good. It is set up with a series of exercises in 40, one week sections. It includes a day of finger-picking a week, but more if you practice the scales and finger-pick some of the riffs. IMO it is not an easy book after the first 6-8 weeks. Some of the material gets tough quickly. But, it is very helpful book for developing technique and expanding your skill set. If you do use it, make sure to listen to the sound snippets to hear the riffs played, otherwise it is tough to get the emphasis in the right places.

    Personally, I learned over the years by listening and just playing what the music seems to call for.
    Richard from Reno
    soprano and concert guy

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