Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Polish for an ebony fretboard:

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Stone Harbor, NJ
    Posts
    963

    Default Polish for an ebony fretboard:

    I need help from all you luthier's and techies. I've been advised to clean up an ebony fretboard. 0000 steel wool and fretboard polish have been recommended. I "googled" this on the sight, and I cannot find a good wax/cleaner for an ebony fretboard. Any suggestions? Thanx
    DEPENDENTS:

    In order of age:

    Kamaka HF-4 Baritone G Linear Tuning 6/2009
    Martin C-1K Concert, Bb Re-entrant Tuning 4/2014
    Kala KA SRMT-TRI Tenor C Linear Tuning 6/1/2015
    Pono MTD-CR Tenor C Re-entrant Tuning 6/21/2016
    Ko'olau Model 100 Tenor C Linear Tuning 7/27/2018

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    So. Oregon
    Posts
    1,652

    Default

    One word: Renaissance Wax. Ok, that's two words but the stuff deserves plenty of words, so here goes:

    Before fretting, I sand to a pretty fine grit as necessary to get a scratch-free appearance and then use the finest Mirka scuff pad to apply the wax and give it some polish. Then follow up with a very fine white scuff pad of unknown brand that I get at Ace. It sounds like you're working with a fretted board so you might want to just start with the finest pad you can find, depending on the condition of the wood and the look you're trying to achieve.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Stone Harbor, NJ
    Posts
    963

    Default

    Thanx saltytri, I'll give it a shot.
    DEPENDENTS:

    In order of age:

    Kamaka HF-4 Baritone G Linear Tuning 6/2009
    Martin C-1K Concert, Bb Re-entrant Tuning 4/2014
    Kala KA SRMT-TRI Tenor C Linear Tuning 6/1/2015
    Pono MTD-CR Tenor C Re-entrant Tuning 6/21/2016
    Ko'olau Model 100 Tenor C Linear Tuning 7/27/2018

  4. #4

    Default

    I use butcher block oil on mine. Cheap and effective...
    ~
    Regards,
    Peter M
    Cornerstone Guitars/Ukes
    www.cornerstoneguitar.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,285

    Default

    Yes, my wife is from a Polish family, and she loves ebony fingerboards! Ugh, sorry, I couldn't resist.

    I've never needed to oil or polish an ebony board, but have one that seems rather dry, so I'll be interested to hear some suggestions for improvement. I love deep dark ebony fingerboards, the best feeling wood there, IMO. I think I tried some Dunlop lemon oil once, but the ebony didn't seem to absorb it like rosewood does.

    As an aside, I think it was on the Jeopardy TV show, I once heard the question:

    Q: What's the only word in the English language whose meaning changes entirely by capitalizing the first letter?

    A: polish

    Dunno if that's true or not.
    Last edited by Ukecaster; 04-13-2019 at 05:47 AM.
    John

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    SE Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ukecaster View Post
    Yes, my wife is from a Polish family, and she loves ebony fingerboards! Ugh, sorry, I couldn't resist.

    I've never needed to oil or polish an ebony board, but have one that seems rather dry, so I'll be interested to hear some suggestions for improvement. I love deep dark ebony fingerboards, the best feeling wood there, IMO. I think I tried some Dunlop lemon oil once, but the ebony didn't seem to absorb it like rosewood does.

    As an aside, I think it was on the Jeopardy TV show, I once heard the question:

    Q: What's the only word in the English language whose meaning changes entirely by capitalizing the first letter?

    A: polish

    Dunno if that's true or not.
    I think Turkey would also fit that definition.

    As for ebony fretboards, a cleanup with 0000 steel wool is usually enough for me, followed by rubbing in a few drops of bore oil, or mineral oil, sesame oil... boiled linseed oil... I've used them all.

    For very cruddy ebony fretboard with lots of grunge and waxy buildup from decades of playing and using polishes, a good cleanup with the steel wool and some naptha - followed by the oil of choice - can really do wonders.

    In any case, whatever oil, use it sparingly, rub it in well, and follow it with a good rubbing in with a clean cotton cloth.
    Last edited by Swamp Yankee; 04-13-2019 at 07:09 AM.
    Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K, Mainland Mahogany Classic soprano; Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Martin C-1 (ca. 1947-1955); Musicguymic's brand "Kolohe" concert; Cordoba 24T; Cordoba 30T; Kiwaya KTT-2K; Cordoba 24B

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    1,391

    Default

    Don’t call me, a Swede, a swede.
    Building blog - http://www.argapa.blogspot.com
    Music and atrocities - http://www.goodcopbadcop.se

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    520

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sven View Post
    Don’t call me, a Swede, a swede.
    Well that's a turnip for the books!
    My friends call me Titch. I have been known to clown.
    Ian Titulaer is my normie name.

    https://sites.google.com/site/titchtheclown/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Auckland NZ
    Posts
    365

    Default

    Well that's a turnip for the books!
    Can't beet that logic
    Miguel

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    963

    Default

    Lettuce stop now.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •