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Thread: Your most unique or unusual wood use?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopaka96707 View Post
    Would you happen to recall if they were they just back and sides or did it include the soundboard?
    Tops, backs and sides. Do a Google search for Jeffery, he's quite well known.
    Chuck Moore
    Moore Bettah Ukuleles
    http://www.moorebettahukes.com

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moore Bettah Ukuleles View Post
    Jeffery Yong, the guitar builder has used monkeypod with with very good success. I saw some sets being offered by StewMac lately so it must be gaining in popularity.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lopaka96707 View Post
    Would you happen to recall if they were they just back and sides or did it include the soundboard?
    Dave Sigman of Little River Ukulele has monkeypod listed as a wood he has available for use. He doesn’t specify whether it could be used for the soundboard, but at the very least it should make some interesting back and sides.
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — 1918-19 Martin 2M Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


    Mead Ambassador/Horticulturist at Heidrun Meadery since 2017

    Teaching Music Together since 2019

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Smith View Post
    I'm very fond of Montery Cypress for top wood. A common, I believe native tree that grows along the US mainland west coast. Wonderful clear tone every bit as good as the best spruces. Golden in color with rich brown streaks. For some reason they plant it around older graveyards.

    Awesome! I love the trees and the interesting grain patterns, too. Very interested to hear a sound sample if you have any!
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — 1918-19 Martin 2M Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


    Mead Ambassador/Horticulturist at Heidrun Meadery since 2017

    Teaching Music Together since 2019

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    For those who are studying the wood.
    1. Make a list of all the wood discussed in this thread.
    2. Find the biological name of the plant and where it grows and what its flowers, fruits and seeds look like.
    2. Look up the mechanical properties of each wood and make a table for comparison.
    3. Look for the trends.
    Note: The mechanical properties are usually shown with some wierd looking units. First make sure all the numbers have the same units, then forget about the units and study what each mechanical property is about. The numbers will help you group woods with similar mechanical properties, you don't need to get confused by the weird units if you make sure you are using the same units. If you make the list on a spreadsheet, you can do sorts to group the wood.
    2nd Note. The temptation is to post your entire spreadsheet, please don't. Let everyone have some learning, maybe post it in late May 2019 if you really feel a need. If you find some interesting things to discuss, just discuss the interesting things.
    Great idea, Bill, but in my limited research along these lines I quickly found that the less commonly used woods tend to either have incomplete or no data around hardness, shrinkage, or elasticity. Hence me channeling the collective UU community for empirical results.

    Edit: if there are other factors in the wood’s objective qualities that I missed in the above post, please chime in! I am just guessing that hardness, how much the wood might shrink or expand, and elasticity would be the most important factors in whether to use a piece of wood for building.

    Also, it doesn’t just have to be about the body. Have you used something different for the neck or even bracing inside? I love the idea of doing aromatic woods like cedar and sandalwood so that the uke smells as good as it sounds and looks.
    Last edited by YogiTom; 04-19-2019 at 05:04 AM.
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — 1918-19 Martin 2M Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


    Mead Ambassador/Horticulturist at Heidrun Meadery since 2017

    Teaching Music Together since 2019

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beau Hannam Ukuleles View Post
    It will involve a former US President signing the label , but that's all i'll say for now until it's all official.
    If the top of the Resolute Desk goes missing...
    ... or maybe I'm wrong

  6. #26
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    I just use curly birch for bindings. I like its texture very much. It is hard and beautiful wood, but little tricky to handle. I wouldn't use it for sides or back, becouse it is too unstable for that and probably crack.binding.jpg
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough."
    -Mario Andretti

  7. #27
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    I hope you don't mind me chiming in. I've never built an ukulele, I'd wind up with a lot of toothpicks and shavings if I tried. Might even sustain a visit to the ER, power tools and I aren't good friends. I almost lost a finger with a dumb chainsaw once!
    But...I think cocobolo wood is still "Not mainstream" in luthiery.
    It's hard as a rock, smells pretty, and the dust will make you sick. I think it makes some of the loveliest sounding/looking ukes in the world.
    cocobolo front 2.jpg
    Concert #260 7.jpg
    Keep Calm 021.JPG
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktuurna View Post
    I just use curly birch for bindings. I like its texture very much. It is hard and beautiful wood, but little tricky to handle. I wouldn't use it for sides or back, becouse it is too unstable for that and probably crack.binding.jpg
    Birch holds a special place in my heart. Ancestors came from Sweden, with the last name Björk which literally means “birch”. Perhaps an heirloom custom build with the old family crest inlayed with birch into the headstock?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie View Post
    I hope you don't mind me chiming in. I've never built an ukulele, I'd wind up with a lot of toothpicks and shavings if I tried. Might even sustain a visit to the ER, power tools and I aren't good friends. I almost lost a finger with a dumb chainsaw once!
    But...I think cocobolo wood is still "Not mainstream" in luthiery.
    It's hard as a rock, smells pretty, and the dust will make you sick. I think it makes some of the loveliest sounding/looking ukes in the world.
    cocobolo front 2.jpg
    Concert #260 7.jpg
    Keep Calm 021.JPG
    Love the player opinions, too, so thanks for chiming in! I’ll admit, I see cocobolo talked about a lot on here, and drool at every picture of the resulting ukes. Your photos are no exception!
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — 1918-19 Martin 2M Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


    Mead Ambassador/Horticulturist at Heidrun Meadery since 2017

    Teaching Music Together since 2019

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktuurna View Post
    I just use curly birch for bindings. ...
    That’d be masurbjörk in Swedish. I have one still growing in my aunt’s garden. She wants it cut down but I wait for it to get bigger.
    Building blog - http://www.argapa.blogspot.com
    Music and atrocities - http://www.goodcopbadcop.se

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubulele View Post
    Monkeypod (aka. raintree, 'ohai, trembesi) has been used for a long time for making ukes, for both tops and bodies. Several big manufacturers have offered monkeypod lines; I have a monkeypod Lanikai, for example. At trade shows, KoAloha has demoed the new KoAlanas (have they appeared on the market yet?), made of trembesi.
    thanks for the info.. i have a few slabs if monkey pod I'm thinking of making a uke with and will be posting an update once the build starts

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