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Thread: Chord Scales

  1. #1
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    Default Chord Scales

    Anybody, ever practice chord scales? I’m usin’ ‘em on my banjos. They sure help with learnin’ to change chords.

    Though chords are one of my weaknesses my chord playing is improving. They’re a kinda fun challenge too.

  2. #2
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    Definitely. I'll record a voice memo on my phone of a chord progression, then practice scales and improvising over my chord progression. Great practice.
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    I practice chord tone scales, following Pete Martin’s vids and exercises re: using the chord tone scale for learning improv (leave out the 6 on the way up, and the 7 on the way down, with scales following chords). Check it at mandolin cafe. Very helpful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bunnyf View Post
    I practice chord tone scales, following Pete Martin’s vids and exercises re: using the chord tone scale for learning improv (leave out the 6 on the way up, and the 7 on the way down, with scales following chords). Check it at mandolin cafe. Very helpful.
    Yeah, bunnyf, I did look at chord scales a bit in Mandolin Cafe, but I’m just beginning now to use them for other purposes.

    I’m self taught, and I‘ve picked up a lot of bad chording problems. For one thing, I’ve refrained from usin’ chords as much as I could, but now, I’ve decided to use them in my playing if I can. So, I ran across the scales in Eddie Peabody’s plectrum banjo lessons and thought that they might help improve my chord frettin’ and finger position. I guess i’ve been pretty sloppy with the few chords that I’ve been usin’. Anyway, that why I began practicing with them.

    I’ll get into usin’ them for improvisation later. First things first.
    Last edited by Down Up Dick; 05-03-2019 at 05:11 AM.

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    Maybe I'm the only one who doesn't know...but what is a chord scale?

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    Would be a good exercise to build up strength and flexibility in you hands. The Hanon exercises would also be good to practise.
    Last edited by Lacole; 05-03-2019 at 06:58 AM.
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    The way that I’m usin’ ‘em is simply to play a correctly fretted C chord then a D chord then an E chord and so on. They’re helpin’ me to fret chords properly and to reach chords better. I’ve been sloppy and have to clean up my act.

    The rest has to do with improvisation, but I’m savin’ that for later.
    Last edited by Down Up Dick; 05-03-2019 at 05:59 AM.

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    I get the feeling that we are all taking about different things. I practice regular scales, ascending and descending; sometimes pentatonic scales; sometimes different intervals; sometimes working up the neck by 1, 3, 5 notes in a particular key to facilitate movement up the neck to 12th fret. Most often though, I will practice chord tone scales (CTS) in several keys, usually G C D. This scale starts with the 1/tonic/root note and goes up 2, 3, 4, 5, (skip 6), 7, 8(octave), then down (skip 7), 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. The way you use this is to play the notes of the G CTS over the G chord in a song; the notes of the C CTS over the C chord, etc. The idea is that this will give you a foundation for a bunch if things, like knowing where the melody is likely to be found and what passing tones will flesh out a run (like in embellished fiddle tunes). Its like a roadmap to improv. Pete Martin explains it better and has excellent videos w/ pdfs.

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    Bunnyf, I do understand what you’re talking about, but I’m doin’ somethin’ different. I’m simply playin’ scales using chords instead of single notes, tryin’ to improve my fretting and my ability to reach the notes in the chords. I got the idea from an Eddie Peabody lesson. It’s working well so far. I’m catchin’ up with what I neglected before.

    Perhaps I’ll get into the improvisation stuff later, but I have a lot of other stuff goin’. Thanks for tryin’ to straighten me out.

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    ohhhh, i see, that’s very interesting. I would never have thought to do that.

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