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Thread: Fingerstyle Practice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Honolulu, HI
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    36

    Default Fingerstyle Practice

    I've been playing guitar for a while and, when I crossed over to ukulele, assigned four fingers (picking hand) to individual strings, but I've never been too stoked on the tone or the speed. I was talking to a friend who plays ukulele way better than I do, and he said that he only uses four fingers when plucking a chord. Generally he just uses three (T, I, M) and alternates the thumb between the G and C strings.

    So I started re-learning this and it's tough!

    Also, just an aside: usually I don't play with fingernails, but greatly prefer the tone of fingernails and have found that the angle of attack from the thumb in particular has a huge impact on the tone and it's something else I'll have to focus on learning.

    But it's still a lot of fun.


  2. Default

    I use 4 fingers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    360

    Default

    I'm currently just using the thumb
    Happy to be an Intermediate Newbie, Penny

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    Palm Beach County FL
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by prb035 View Post
    I'm currently just using the thumb
    That how I play. Guess I'm too lazy or satisfied with the status quo to change. But that inspires me to try,

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plunker View Post
    That how I play. Guess I'm too lazy or satisfied with the status quo to change. But that inspires me to try,
    Ha-ha Once I saw that Jame's Hill prefers the thumb for a certain tone, I realized that the thumb could be underrated!

    Happy to be an Intermediate Newbie, Penny

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Russ View Post
    I've been playing guitar for a while and, when I crossed over to ukulele, assigned four fingers (picking hand) to individual strings, but I've never been too stoked on the tone or the speed. I was talking to a friend who plays ukulele way better than I do, and he said that he only uses four fingers when plucking a chord. Generally he just uses three (T, I, M) and alternates the thumb between the G and C strings.

    So I started re-learning this and it's tough!

    Also, just an aside: usually I don't play with fingernails, but greatly prefer the tone of fingernails and have found that the angle of attack from the thumb in particular has a huge impact on the tone and it's something else I'll have to focus on learning.

    But it's still a lot of fun.

    Very nice picking Russ, hopefully I will play as well as you do one day!
    Happy to be an Intermediate Newbie, Penny

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
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    36

    Default

    Thanks! I really appreciate it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    the wild west, Canada
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    Default

    Interesting. I try to stick to PIMA, but occasionaly just use my thumb when the picking tends to be mostly sequential. I'll have to try this out.
    Glenn

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
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    Default

    I usually use PIMA when fingerpicking, but when playing Travis-style patterns with alternating bass as you do here, I always switch to PIM and use the thumb to play the alternating bass.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    L.A. California
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    Very nice picking Russ.
    Fast, accurate, and very musical.
    What's the chord sequence?
    Playing my Magic Fluke and grinning like a fool!

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