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Thread: Suggestions of baritones?

  1. #11
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    any aversion to buying used? id keep an eye on the marketplace here. plenty of folks move up from a nice intermediate quality instrument to something quite nice. at 60-70% of original price these mid-market ukes can be a great value. buying used will put you into a much nicer instrument. being that you are already a player, I think that it’s something to consider. most all my nicest instruments are used. I could not have afforded them new. People generally take pretty good care of their ukes. Often they can be selling just cuz they don’t like the size, or they have given up on learning to play. Vintage, is a whole nother deal, where if you don’t know much, you can get a stinker that may need expensive work to be playable. just my 2c

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bunnyf View Post
    any aversion to buying used? id keep an eye on the marketplace here. plenty of folks move up from a nice intermediate quality instrument to something quite nice. at 60-70% of original price these mid-market ukes can be a great value. buying used will put you into a much nicer instrument. being that you are already a player, I think that it’s something to consider. most all my nicest instruments are used. I could not have afforded them new. People generally take pretty good care of their ukes. Often they can be selling just cuz they don’t like the size, or they have given up on learning to play. Vintage, is a whole nother deal, where if you don’t know much, you can get a stinker that may need expensive work to be playable. just my 2c
    It can be hit and miss, but if you find people like us who have more ukes than we have time to play, some people are selling ukuleles in like-new condition. As long as you know your prices, you can avoid the people who want to recoup 80-100% (or more!) of their purchase price.
    Glenn

  3. #13
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    May 2019
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    Thanks again, guys! I found videos on The Ukulele Site that go over what they do when they setup a uke, which was immensely helpful (so I know what to expect). I've found a handful of stores that might stock baritones that I can at least try out...they're an hour away, so I'll have to find time to actually check (I'll probably still buy from one of the sites Jim suggested because I'm not under the impression that any of them do setups).

    I'll try to keep an eye out for used ones on the marketplace too. I'm going to be moving around a lot over the next two months, so I have a fair bit of time before I can reasonably buy anyway, since I won't be able to receive the package.

    Thanks for the tip, Glenn. I was planning on adjusting the saddle on my KA-C right before I change the strings (which it desperately needs, the poor thing).

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by apdsqueaky View Post
    Someone else also recently suggested Cordobas to me, funny enough [they had a 23B]. Both the 23B and 24B are gorgeous but a little bit out of my price range. I have a bit of a weird love-hate relationship with spruce [sometimes I can't stand how it looks for some reason, but other times I'm fine with it]. I'll look into the 20B and try to find a store in the area that carries it [no luck so far, but I'll keep hunting]. Do you know how the Cordoba baritones sound compared to each other? Is there a significant difference? Does the slimmer body affect the sound/projection at all? Also what kind of finish do they have?

    On a tangentially related note, I've heard solid woods are more susceptible to temperature/humidity changes than laminate. I've never done anything special to care for my KA-C regarding climate control [it's held up fine, although I feel the need to give it a proper cleaning now and it desperately needs a string change], so I'm curious if there's anything particular I should be careful about or pay more attention to.

    Sorry, I have a lot of questions
    If you check out Reverb, there are usually a few B stock and returned Cordoba 24Bs to be had for less than $150. I have one I picked up for about $120 that way.
    They are lightly built, responsive, very nice looking..with a lightly applied satin finish. they play easily with their wide fretboards and fast neck finish and profile, and they sound great! Quite loud, and with a warm, dry, woody tone.
    Nice instruments, those Cordoba 24 series ukes with their solid cedar tops, but I’m not a fan of baritones in general so...I’ll probably sell or trade in my 24B soon. I don’t think I’ll part with my 24T though, I love that uke!
    Last edited by Swamp Yankee; 05-31-2019 at 08:57 AM.
    Sopranos: Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Martin C-1 (ca. 1947-1955); Musicguymic's Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

  5. #15
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    Default You want a baritone

    Quote Originally Posted by apdsqueaky View Post
    Hi all! New here, but I've been playing a Kala KA-C for a few years now. Almost entirely self-taught, although I was classically trained in piano and have a very strong background in music theory, so that helped. I originally learned on my old roommate's Harmony baritone, and while I've grown to love the concert, I'm much more accustomed the baritone's lower, guitar-like sound (the re-entrant tuning of the concert put me off for a long time, and the KA-C's high action didn't help). It was also easier to play most of the songs we wanted to sing and not feel like something was entirely missing (i.e. the bass notes).

    Long story short, I want to get a baritone that I can play and occasionally take with me to my old roommate's without worrying too much if I put a scratch or a little dink in it (I will knock it over at some point, a glossy finish will get scratched up, and I don't want to be so worried about that that I'm afraid to play it). I was looking in the $100-$150 range, considering the Kala KA-B (if the formula works, why change it?), Luna Vintage Mahogany Baritone (inexpensive and I like the simple laser-etched design - simple, yet different), and Oscar Schmidt OU52 (inexpensive). I haven't found as many reviews or comparisons of the latter two, so any comments on build quality or how they sound compared to other baritones would be appreciated. I know that a lot of ukes in this price range are still "budget" ukes for beginners that maybe won't be as satisfying in the long run. I don't really consider myself a beginner anymore, so I'm willing to go a little over that budget for something higher quality that will last me, as I don't really intend on getting another uke after this.

    So any recommendations? Most stores near me are chains like Guitar Center and Music & Arts, and from what I've seen, a lot of them don't carry ukes (or don't have baritones), so it's harder for me to go out and try them.

    TL;DR - Please give recommendations of budget-friendly baritones for an intermediate-ish player.
    So does it really need to be a new one? Have you ever heard of Favilla?
    They are solid mahogany and have a wonderful tone as well as a nice feel and sound. I f you were near Salem Oregon, I would invite you over to play and hear them....and take your pick for $225.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swamp Yankee View Post
    If you check out Reverb, there are usually a few B stock and returned Cordoba 24Bs to be had for less than $150. I have one I picked up for about $120 that way.
    They are lightly built, responsive, very nice looking..with a lightly applied satin finish. they play easily with their wide fretboards and fast neck finish and profile, and they sound great! Quite loud, and with a warm, dry, woody tone.
    Nice instruments, those Cordoba 24 series ukes with their solid cedar tops, but I’m not a fan of baritones in general so...I’ll probably sell or trade in my 24B soon. I don’t think I’ll part with my 24T though, I love that uke!
    I've looked briefly at the B-stock listed on Reverb. Seems like that would be a good option, although I'm still trying to understand how severe a defect relegates an instrument to B-stock. If you do decide to sell your 24B, I might be interested [after I determine the humidity of my apartment to decide if solid is a reasonable option for me at the moment].

    Quote Originally Posted by TheCraftedCow View Post
    So does it really need to be a new one? Have you ever heard of Favilla?
    They are solid mahogany and have a wonderful tone as well as a nice feel and sound. I f you were near Salem Oregon, I would invite you over to play and hear them....and take your pick for $225.
    I had not, but now I have something else to research when I have proper internet again I'm not opposed to a well-loved and maintained uke. After all that's what I learned on...well, the well-loved part anyway

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by apdsqueaky View Post
    I've looked briefly at the B-stock listed on Reverb. Seems like that would be a good option, although I'm still trying to understand how severe a defect relegates an instrument to B-stock.
    The B-stock I've seen usually involves some minor defect on the finish of an instrument in a small location. Sometimes it's hard to notice. If it's in a location you don't see when playing, that's ideal. Mim has some good photos of the defects on her B-stock items, and they're pretty minor. Might vary from each manufacturer as to what they consider B-stock.

    I will say, I've considered B-stock a few times and in those cases the price difference wasn't great enough for me so I paid the extra money for new stock. Depends how much you care about a few minor flaws.
    Last edited by glennerd; 06-08-2019 at 05:49 AM. Reason: clarification
    Glenn

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by apdsqueaky View Post
    I've looked briefly at the B-stock listed on Reverb. Seems like that would be a good option, although I'm still trying to understand how severe a defect relegates an instrument to B-stock. If you do decide to sell your 24B, I might be interested [after I determine the humidity of my apartment to decide if solid is a reasonable option for me at the moment].
    Specifically in the case of the 24 series Cordobas, I strongly suspect most of them are returned for scuffs on the cedar tops. The finish on these is very thin, which is wonderful for the tone.... but the cedar tops do get scuffed up more easily as cedar is a soft wood.

    In short, Ithink many buyers send them back for purely cosmetic reasons.

    With the more reputable sellers, they describe any repairs they’ve made, so it’s often a matter of choosing one that just had some surface marks, instead of one that had a crack repair.
    Sopranos: Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Martin C-1 (ca. 1947-1955); Musicguymic's Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

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