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Thread: cutting inlays

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Bellevue, KY
    Posts
    140

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    Quote Originally Posted by cathouse willy View Post
    Thankyou for your replies, the laser tool has a steep price and learning curve so for the few ukes that i will build so it seems it's not going to happen.Based on the replies I will try some simple hand cut inlays.I can picture how to cut the inlay part but cutting the cavity? has me baffled. I'd be grateful for any tips on cutting them
    Thanks
    Bill
    A dremel with some sort of attachment to keep the tool above the work. I've used the regular Dremel plunge router for a while, but I'll be getting the Stewmac router base soonn. Good downcut inlay bits are kinda expensive. I use 1/32", 1/16, and 1/8". There are many ways of routing the channel. I personally glue each piece to be inlaid down with a tiny drop or two of Elmer's glue and scribe around them with an X-acto blade and scribe tool. Once all the scribing is done I remove the pieces by heating them up with a damp paper towel and solder gun. Then route away to the depth of the inlay pieces. Tight corners sometimes have to be cut with an X-acto blade; undercut, slice, undercut, slice... You'll get the gist once you start doing it.

    There are a few videos on Youtube worth watching... very few... Larry Robinson's instructional videos are good.
    Last edited by Diogenes Blue; 06-06-2019 at 08:08 AM.
    Victor Jones
    Blue Frog Ukuleles

    Bellevue, KY
    bluefrogvic@gmail.com
    http://bluefrogukes.weebly.com/index.html

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    2,110

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    Quote Originally Posted by cathouse willy View Post
    how to cut the inlay part but cutting the cavity? has me baffled. I'd be grateful for any tips on cutting them
    Thanks
    Bill
    Below is a picture of the StewMac base in action. Self explanatory...

    Precision_Router_Base_Complete_Set.jpg

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Bellevue, KY
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    140

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    Just make sure to use the larger bits on large areas and take multiple passes. You don't want to route deeper than the bit is wide or go too quickly. You'll break a bit. And like I said, they're costly.
    If you have the money, LMI's "Rotary Tool Plunge Assembly" is the Cadillac.
    Victor Jones
    Blue Frog Ukuleles

    Bellevue, KY
    bluefrogvic@gmail.com
    http://bluefrogukes.weebly.com/index.html

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bell Buckle, TN 37020
    Posts
    188

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    Cutting / Inlay Pearl and Ebony is not impossible with a laser but it requires a very precise lens and considerable more power than the normal consumer laser along with several variation on normal laser techniques........CW2565.jpgCW2567.jpgCW2569.jpgCW2570.jpgCW2582.jpg

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bell Buckle, TN 37020
    Posts
    188

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,029

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Waldron View Post
    Wonderfull tech but without soul. No sign of the craftsmans hand
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dponeil@xtra.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Herts, UK
    Posts
    166

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    Wonderfull tech but without soul. No sign of the craftsmans hand
    Or perhaps just a different type of craftsmanship.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,029

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andyk View Post
    Or perhaps just a different type of craftsmanship.
    With respect there is no craft if a machine did it all. just my humble opinion
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dponeil@xtra.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Kapolei, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,842

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    Wonderfull tech but without soul. No sign of the craftsmans hand
    There was a point in time that I was jealous about the accuracy of inlay being done by machine. After talking to Derek Shimizu years ago when he started offering laser engraving to bring art “to the masses”, I realized the more accessible artwork is on an instrument, the more value there is in custom inlay, read: by hand. Basically, I learned to appreciate those that do inlay by machine, which gives value to those that do it by hand.

    No doubt, everytime I see a name on an instrument, my thought is “why isn’t that a signature?” The answer is usually because it was machine done. Note: I like doing signatures. Is it as accurate as a Cnc/laser inlay? Of course not; will never be. But there’s still a market for them.

    That said, just ordered another Knew Concepts saw, a Mk IV with the swivel.
    Last edited by Kekani; 06-08-2019 at 12:17 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Hawaii Island
    Posts
    146

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    Kekani- When you get that Mark IV, do a report back. I have all the lighter aluminum ones and am curious if the frame is sturdier. I tried the birdcage one, luckily when they were cheaper, and just did not like it at all. Hope you're doing great over there.--Bob

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