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Thread: A lesson in loving what you have

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Marin County, CA
    Posts
    536

    Default A lesson in loving what you have

    As some may know, I recently pulled my listing for the aNueNue Moon Bird Soprano which I originally bought in a moment of UAS insanity. After recording a sound sample and review for my NUD, it sat in its case, unplayed. Hence why I thought selling it would be a better fate for it.

    Well, today I pulled it out, barely had to tune it up, and started noodling around on it again.

    Wtf was I thinking trying to sell this thing off at such a financial loss?? I kind of want to go back in time and slap myself for ever thinking I couldn’t have a lot of fun playing this little Bird. I would put it only slightly behind my Kanile‘a Platinum in terms of combining a bright tone with good note separation and a rich, warm sustain. The smaller size is t nearly the drawback I originally thought it was.

    I’ve even noticed things I didn’t before, like a very subtle radius on the back! I love this design element, and I think it really helps this little thing boom and ring out so sweetly. Also, it smells fantastic inside the sound hole (something I’ve only recently started to notice in ukes). The back brace also appears to be made of matching rosewood, making it disappear when you look inside. A nice touch.

    All this to say, I’m glad I had the opportunity to give this one another chance. Knowing what I know now, I would’ve been very sad to let it go for the price I was asking in the marketplace.

    Anyone else out there revisit a previously “not for me” uke in their collection and discovered a new love or appreciation for it?
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


    Mead Ambassador/Horticulturist at Heidrun Meadery since 2017

    Teaching Music Together since 2019

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Posts
    222

    Default

    On the (much) lower end I've been having a similar experience with my Kala-TEMB. I don't have room for it and I have too many tenors, but it's pretty and it makes me smile to play it and it does sound noticeably different. Every time I go to Craigslist it I end up playing instead!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
    Posts
    5,807

    Default

    I have a love/hate relationship with a couple of mine too, but never get as far as thinking about selling, would lose too much.

    Take them out now & again, have a pick or strum, & a few tunes later, put them back into their gig bags - until next time.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YogiTom View Post
    Anyone else out there revisit a previously “not for me” uke in their collection and discovered a new love or appreciation for it?
    I sold five, realized later that I had made a mistake, and then bought them again - both new and used. That's why I tend to buy more than I sell. I'm afraid I'll regret it later.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Croaky Keith View Post
    ...but never get as far as thinking about selling, would lose too much.
    Losing money is always a consideration when selling anything. On the other hand, a sale would provide income. If I pay $2,000 for a uke and sell it for $1,000, I'm gaining $1,000. The only loss was incurred when I bought it. Sitting in the case, it's not earning you anything, unless you use the uke to make money.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,608

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    Yeah, I felt bad that one wouldn't sell for you (been there), but glad you redicovered it, and are keeping it, very unique ukes. I'd love to try one someday.
    John

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    373

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    There’s a lesson for us all here thanks for sharing your experience Jeff
    Happy to be an Intermediate Newbie, Penny

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    Losing money is always a consideration when selling anything. On the other hand, a sale would provide income. If I pay $2,000 for a uke and sell it for $1,000, I'm gaining $1,000. The only loss was incurred when I bought it. Sitting in the case, it's not earning you anything, unless you use the uke to make money.
    It's NEVER earning you anything unless you play professionally or the value has increased. Selling, however, allows you to recover some of your funds and lessens your loss.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Honolulu
    Posts
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    Such a lesson applies to nearly everything in life. Too often we focus on acquisitions and goals and don't realize or appreciate that everything we need is already there...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    Losing money is always a consideration when selling anything. On the other hand, a sale would provide income. If I pay $2,000 for a uke and sell it for $1,000, I'm gaining $1,000. The only loss was incurred when I bought it. Sitting in the case, it's not earning you anything, unless you use the uke to make money.
    The way I see it you are out $1000. You are without the uke and you are out the $1000 you could have spent on something else. (the opportunity cost) The only thing you gained out of the scenario was the experience you had with the uke while you owned it.
    Ohana CK-42R - all-solid concert, sinker redwood top, rosewood body, maple binding, Ltd. Edition
    Kala KA-FMCG- solid/lam concert, spruce top, spalted flame maple body, mahogany binding
    Ohana CK-120G - all-solid concert, 5A acacia top sides and back, mahogany binding, Limited Edition
    Ohana SK-30M - all-solid mahogany long neck soprano (concert scale)
    Romero ST - solid/lam concert, spruce top, mahogany body

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