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Thread: A lesson in loving what you have

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikelz777 View Post
    The way I see it you are out $1000. You are without the uke and you are out the $1000 you could have spent on something else. (the opportunity cost) The only thing you gained out of the scenario was the experience you had with the uke while you owned it.
    This is sorta how I feel about that. It really doesn't feel so much like loss, though, as much as "investment" in myself.

    I'd been having a lot of trouble with my favorite uke, intonations issues. It was driving me crazy to play up the neck, it was so far out that even other people cringed. I was constantly checking my tuning. I decided that the bridge must be placed incorrectly, and 2 luthiers sort of agreed with me. Not wanting to have it in a shop for days, or weeks, I jumped on the chance to have a new custom uke built.
    Then after having what seemed like issues (buzzes) to me, everyone else said I was nuts, I put the original uke in the hands of Donna Loprinzi. She measured and measured and found another problem, and adjusted it as well as she could without major surgery.
    Now it is more fun to play, it will never be perfect, so I'm encouraged to play the new uke for stuff that requires fretting above #7.
    The buzzing I think I hear in the other uke comes and goes, but I know it isn't operator error. I'd quickly admit it if it were, and change my hand position, or ignore it on an open string. The chords and notes go by quicker than they used to anyway....
    I'm learning to appreciate more and more, the ukes I have. I don't think I need any more at this point.
    I'm pretty content with these little guys!
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Steamy Hilo, HI
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    I love everything I have. That's why I'm such a hoarder.
    Cordoba guilele
    Rebel N.E.O. tenor
    Birger Huber Baritone

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
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    I love many ukes. I just don't feel the need to own everything I love.

  4. #14
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    Dec 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkrownd View Post
    I love everything I have. That's why I'm such a hoarder.
    Owning 3 different sized ukes is not hoarding. Unless there is more ukes than the ones in your signature. Haha.
    Kamaka HF-1 || Martin S-1 Uke || Eddy Finn EFTS-20-S || Martin C1K Uke || Enya EUT-M6E
    Check out my ukulele themed paintings in UU forum thread

  5. #15
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    Dec 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by YogiTom View Post
    ... All this to say, Iím glad I had the opportunity to give this one another chance. Knowing what I know now, I wouldíve been very sad to let it go for the price I was asking in the marketplace.

    Anyone else out there revisit a previously ďnot for meĒ uke in their collection and discovered a new love or appreciation for it?
    Tom, Iím so glad that youíre keeping the fat little bird around. Iím such a fan of it and can I say itís the only adorable ukulele at the high end? I understand your plight as my wifey constantly drops gentle reminders where Iím merely window shopping for ukes on my phone. Iím being given with the ď1 out 1 inĒ sentence too.

    I did sold off my only concert uke of solid cedar with rosewood back and sides which I think I should most probably kept it. But i was pretty certain that Iím a pure soprano guy at that point in time. I ended buying a Martin concert C1K to replace it.
    Kamaka HF-1 || Martin S-1 Uke || Eddy Finn EFTS-20-S || Martin C1K Uke || Enya EUT-M6E
    Check out my ukulele themed paintings in UU forum thread

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie View Post
    This is sorta how I feel about that. It really doesn't feel so much like loss, though, as much as "investment" in myself.
    !
    I so agree. Life is filled with investments in ourselves like eating, caring for others and pursuit of our passions that feed the soul :-) Even the animals at home seem to listen and enjoy Gramís uke time. At least Iím a happier person when Iím strumming and hopefully making progress :-)
    K
    Sopranos, Concerts, and Tenors

    4 Sale: Pineapple - MP Cali, Tenor: Washburn, Luna Tattoo

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikelz777 View Post
    The way I see it you are out $1000. You are without the uke and you are out the $1000 you could have spent on something else. (the opportunity cost) The only thing you gained out of the scenario was the experience you had with the uke while you owned it.
    Logic and beautiful ukuleles don't play well together. : ) If I was being purely logical, I would have done a lot of research and bought just one $500 uke and stuck with it, resisting the temptation to buy other sizes or styles. The same applies to a lot of things. I should have just two pairs of pants - one for working around the house and one for dressing up. For me, much of the fun of ukuleles is the variety.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Utah
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    A few months back I debated selling a uke that I dearly loved because it had a few features I disliked (older friction tuners, gloss neck) and lacked a feature I wanted (pick-up). I could sell it and buy another model of that brand that was "perfect," or I could invest some time & effort and get new tuners and a pick-up installed. This uke had such a wonderful sound, feel, and playability that I chose to modify it instead of sell it. Now, in retrospect I know that I made the right decision. Selling it would have been totally dumb and I would have regretted it immensely.

    On the other hand, I have tried & sold about a dozen other ukes. Some were fairly quick decisions. Others stayed with me for awhile longer. I've never had a big regret about any of those.
    My ukulele family.....
    KoAloha Koa concert - circa 2006
    KoAloha Special Issue longneck soprano - Port Orford Cedar & Koa - circa 2015
    aNueNue Moon Bird concert - Spruce & Rosewood -2018
    Blackbird Clara - 2019

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    on a sunny FL beach
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    Quote Originally Posted by AQUATOPAZ View Post
    I love many ukes. I just don't feel the need to own everything I love.
    This is me.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    Santa Monica, CA
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    I was surprised when it didn't sell and am glad you found a new appreciation for it. Time will tell if it sticks or fades. This is a constant issue for me with traditional sopranos. I always want them, but very rarely play them when I have them. Then I sell them. Then I start looking at Laughlin 5K or's or Kiwaya Master's. Then I think, I'm an idiot for even thinking about sinking that kind of money in something experience tells me I won't play over time. So I bought a longneck KoAloha all 'hog soprano thinking that would fill the niche for me. It is a great uke. But again, I almost never play it. And almost any uke is easy to sell when it's not being played much. Then I get it out and think, why would I sell this? Limited production. To me, it sounds better than the koa ones and can scratch my soprano itch. And then it gets put away and the cycle starts anew.

    I have been selling a lot of instruments lately and still have a handful to shed which includes many tenors that get regular play. I just have too many and there are still a few other builders whose ukes I'd like to own for awhile, so some have to go. And I know as I play each it only makes it harder to decide. So I tell myself by letting them go, I'll get to meet new ones and new friends.
    More an appreciator of the ukulele than a true player. My motto is: "Don't matter how good it ring if it ain't got some bling."

    Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.óVoltaire

    Curious about the relative importance of tonewood vs. the luthier? See Luthiers for a Cause to learn more!

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