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Thread: Chord melody

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Choirguy View Post
    Standard Chord melody, such as those on my blog (free:https://ukestuff.wordpress.com/my-ukulele-tabs/) are meant to be played with the thumb, placing the melody as either part of the chord or single notes (as needed). You can break them apart into more traditional fingerstytle, but Chord Melody is a great way to get into reading tablature AND using the ukulele as a melody instrument. It's kind of boring to just pluck out melodies all the time. And it is also unrealistic to think that we'll pick up a ukulele and sound like Jake Shimabukuro (who has been playing--almost exclusively as a focus--since he was 4).
    Hope you add more songs!

    So, on How Great Thou Art, above God is the C for the chord. But the GCE strings are open and nothing is marked on the A string. SO, do you play the C chord there and strum, or do you just strum the GCE strings and ignore the C chord above God? In other words, do you play the chord listed and the fingering listed on the TAB? (I sure hope that makes sense . . .)
    Jan >^..^<
    (AKA Chopped Liver)


    You say 'Crazy Cat Lady' like it's a bad thing!

    "Out of clutter, find simplicity." Albert Einstein

  2. #12
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    The chord names are just there for reference; you only play the notes on the tablature...in that case, you strum strings 4, 3, and 2 with your thumb.
    My ukulele blog: http://ukestuff.info

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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Choirguy View Post
    The chord names are just there for reference; you only play the notes on the tablature...in that case, you strum strings 4, 3, and 2 with your thumb.
    Ok, that's what I thought but decided to ask anyway! Thanks!
    Jan >^..^<
    (AKA Chopped Liver)


    You say 'Crazy Cat Lady' like it's a bad thing!

    "Out of clutter, find simplicity." Albert Einstein

  4. #14
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    I love playing chord melodies. I'm a fair/shy singer, so these work out great for me. I'm working on easier things, and adding more difficult elements as I go. I start with arrangements by Mike Lynch, RJ Putter, and others. Then I either play them as is, or make some little changes to suit my style, or ability. Like Choirguy, I use Uke Buddy, The Uke Helper, and Brian's Huge Chordlist Collection to figure out different fingerings of chords. I've written 2 chord melodies of my own, using a fret board map, and those chord websites to figure things out. I just finished tabbing out a simple version of "It Had To Be You" to teach my ukulele group next month.
    My ukulele family.....
    KoAloha Koa concert - circa 2006
    KoAloha Special Issue longneck soprano - Port Orford Cedar & Koa - circa 2015
    aNueNue Moon Bird concert - Spruce & Rosewood -2018
    Blackbird Clara - 2019

  5. #15
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    Notes, no chord symbols. Trying to learn how to read music.

    And you wouldn’t recognize Media...a lot of changes, bit nice ones. It’s a great little town.

  6. #16
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    If you take the time to learn the 12 basic Major Triads and the 12 basic Minor Triads you can then compose Chord Melodies. For example a song calls for a C chord and the melody note is D. Just add as much of the C chord as you can under the D note. Do that with each melody note of the song. For whatever chord is called for add as much as possible under the melody note. Now go back and take out notes that sound too muddy. If some strange note sounds good, throw it in. Now you have the basics down and can work from their and play simple chord melodies at the same time. As time goes by you can learn more advanced chords like 7th, Maj chords, and so on. They just add more flavor to the song. When I first picked up a ukulele I already knew chords well from playing piano. My instructor was a chord nut, for real and I learned all chords and inversions from triads to 13ths so it was easy for me to start right out on chord melodies. Where I have problems is using my arrangement or those of Mike Lynch from his books is, I lack the natural talent to embellish the arrangement with cool licks that make the song sound real good.

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