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Thread: Why?

  1. #31
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    Jun 2019
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    I think it depends on the situation - the group I play with is a social group of varying abilities and the intention is for everyone to enjoy themselves and to get new people to come along and start enjoying themselves too. I often have a quiet strum at the back between songs, unless I'm having a quiet chat with someone, while we wait for the next song to be chosen, and if people started telling me to stop doing so, I wouldn't bother going back. I don't need to be told off for doing the very thing I'm there to do.

    If I struggle with a song that we've just played, then I'm going to (quietly) go over the tricky chord change, or the new chord or whatever, having watched someone better than me do it successfully, absolutely. Lots of people do it, and if this wasn't allowed then how is anyone going to get better? It's all very well practicing at home but why not do so with warmed up hands, and with people to ask?

    If I went to a workshop or a lesson, then it would of course be different, but a strumalong is by its very nature a relaxed, informal affair. If it's not relaxed and informal, it's not a strumalong, it's a workshop.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    Springfield, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Russ View Post
    It seems like it's human nature. I was chastised by a girlfriend I was breaking up with because I was also plucking my guitar at the same time.

    I know it was impolite and since then I've tried to work on it.

    But with other people, it helps them concentrate. Stevie Ray Vaughan's wife would tell him to play guitar when she had important stuff to talk about or he wouldn't be able to focus.
    Plucking your guitar while breaking up with your girlfriend is generally considered not the greatest form, Russ, but I guess it doesn't matter too much, if you're breaking up with her anyway... (You know I'm only kidding!)

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Sheehan View Post
    Plucking your guitar while breaking up with your girlfriend is generally considered not the greatest form, Russ, but I guess it doesn't matter too much, if you're breaking up with her anyway... (You know I'm only kidding!)
    Right! Breaking up is one thing, but proposing to her would be quite another. You don't have to make a good impression when you're breaking up. : )
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Chicago
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    I don't know... get a bunch of players in a room, put ukes in their hands and set new songsheets in front of them. What could happen? It's our natural tendency to start playing. Sadly not everybody has the presence of mind to realize when they're being inconsiderate.

    The purpose of a uke club is to socialize... but it's also to play the ukulele. Presumably all together. You can noodle at home by your lonesome. The time you spend noodling at the club is time you're wasting -- and you're wasting it for everybody, not just yourself.
    Sorry to be a curmudgeon. But I get tired of repeating "Page 5!" seven or eight times until everybody hears what song we're playing next.

    Every uke club needs to reach its own balance between chit-chat and playing. Instruction and playing. Anecdotes and playing. Announcements about upcoming events and... playing. It'll never be the perfect balance for everybody all of the time. But we can be kind and enjoy each others' company. A little additional patience wouldn't kill any of us.

    The Ideal Uke Club Inside My Brain has a lounge for chatting and a room for playing -- maybe several rooms for players with different interests and skill levels. Then we all meet together to play "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere" and then we adjourn to go bar-hopping past midnight. YMMV

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    SE Connecticut, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    Right! Breaking up is one thing, but proposing to her would be quite another. You don't have to make a good impression when you're breaking up. : )
    Indeed, the appropriate thing to do when proposing is to play an accordion. Lederhosen optional... but to really make an impression...
    Sopranos: aNueNue Khaya Mahogany 1, Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Martin C-1 (ca. 1947-1955); Musicguymic's Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Illinois
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    I think it has less to do with specific ukulele groups and more to do with group of musicians in general. I was a front man of a "fairly known in the small community" band. As a result I attended a lot of rehearsals. In almost every band there is a musician (could be a drummer or a lead guitar, doesn't matter) who doesn't pay attention and keeps noodling no matter what other people do. You have to address him personally to stop and listen. Sometimes several times during the same rehearsal. Perhaps there is a psychiatrist on the forum that can explain this phenomena! Is there a doctor in the house?!

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Southern USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    I just joined a couple of strum-a-long groups and I have enjoyed playing with them more than I thought that I would. I know that this is going to come off as complaining and will probably go sideways on me quickly, but I got to ask it. Why is it that when you get a bunch of ukulele players together for a strum-along, while others are talking about upcoming gigs, doing announcements, introducing songs, whatever business needs to be addressed, people are picking at their ukuleles like they can not sit still for a second without making some noise? I find it a lot in workshops as well. The presenter is up there trying to talk or show how to do something, and a half dozen people in the peanut gallery are rudely plucking away. So I'm just curious, why do people do that? Do they want attention? Do they think that they are making a good impression and others will admire their pluckability? Are they nervous and they just have fidgety fingers? Are they bored and mentally drifting off in their own plucky world, oblivious to the rest trying to listen? I just want to know why they can't stop long enough to listen. It happens at every group activity I go to. I don't want this to turn into a bitch session, I would really like some incessant pluckers to chime in and explain what they are doing. I'm curious. I think that if I knew why it would not be so annoying.
    It is rude. When I catch myself doing it, it is because Iím bored. I do it unconsciously, but typically I knock it off pretty quickly.

    Tom
    TomtheBaptist

  8. #38
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    Jul 2011
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    Nashville, TN USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomthebaptist View Post
    It is rude. When I catch myself doing it, it is because Iím bored. I do it unconsciously, but typically I knock it off pretty quickly.

    Tom
    I think folks often do it unconsciously, without realizing it. I've been in a few classes and workshops with "No Noodling" signs prominently posted, and that seems to help a great deal.
    If music be the food of love, play on! -Bill Shakespeare

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