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Thread: Cheapest decent Uke strings

  1. #21
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    Graham I just purchased a bunch of strings from Elderly Music and Amazon for the ultra cheap strings they were all in the $2-4 range. Especially with the Oais strings as you can get two sets out of one pack. But then most things luthier related are cheaper here in the states.

    Its ironic though. One of my suppliers for high end Koa is in England of all places.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by dofthesea View Post
    Graham I just purchased a bunch of strings from Elderly Music and Amazon for the ultra cheap strings they were all in the $2-4 range. Especially with the Oais strings as you can get two sets out of one pack. But then most things luthier related are cheaper here in the states.

    Its ironic though. One of my suppliers for high end Koa is in England of all places.
    Sorry, my comment wasn’t meant to indicate that low priced strings weren’t available in the USA - clumsy writing in my part. It was strictly as written in that strings are, I find, relatively expensive in the U.K. ie we don’t get low USA prices or USA bargains. M600’s purchased in the USA are listed at $6 inc shipping (eBay) but here in the U.K. the price is (converts to) roughly $9. Oasis strings aren’t readily available here and if they were the price would almost certainly be inflated.

    It is good that you have pointed people in the direction of strings which (I believe you are suggesting) are low cost and worth buying.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 07-04-2019 at 10:40 AM.

  3. #23
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    I’ll shut up really soon. I promise. But four reels in the right guages of the expensive Seaguar blue label leader would be 85 bucks (and there are cheaper leaders). 25 yards of strings in total. Maybe you wouldn’t get 50 sets out of 25 yards but surely 40 sets, if I recall correctly what a yard is. But those ultra cheap strings from Amazon might be good enough for your students. Now I’ll shut up.
    Building blog - http://www.argapa.blogspot.com
    Music and atrocities - http://www.goodcopbadcop.se

  4. #24
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    Using Sven's gauges and suggested string material a set would cost just under 2. This is derived from buying 50 yard reels = 4573cm and assuming that each string is 2 foot long - 60cm. You'd pay in the UK 140 for the reels and get 75 sets.... Seems to me like a good price and after all, that is what string manufacturers are generally using for fluorocarbon strings. Now shelling out 140 might seems a stretch but to be fair, in the UK, that is a sit down meal at a good restaurant for 4 people... a double room with breakfast in a nice hotel or in my case, a return train ticket from Bangor to London! You just have to think about the investment, and if you are making more than a few ukes or getting through a few sets of strings a year, the only way to go.

    Personally I buy Worth Browns in 6 gauges on 50M reels and pay the bill - I couldn't tell you how much each set cost as it's not something I pay attention to. I just wanna decent set of strings on my ukes and these fit the bill. However as clients seem to know better than me in the string department and nearly always change them I am thinking I may go down the Seagur route with my latest designs... perhaps I'll tell you about those later this week
    Last edited by Pete Howlett; 07-07-2019 at 12:38 PM.

  5. #25

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    If you don't use a lot of strings buying reels of Seagar or other quality fluorocarbon line isn''t worth it. I would only want to use Seagar or other fluorocarbon line that was no older than a year or two. It goes bad. No serious fisherman will use last seasons line or leader.. We don't target salmon or other valuable game fish with last years line. Rockfish yes. Consider fluorocarbon line perishable. You can extend the life of line by sealing in airtight packs.
    Last edited by Michael Smith; 07-07-2019 at 01:36 PM.
    Michael Smith
    Goat Rock Ukulele
    www.goatrockukulele.com

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    Petaluma, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Smith View Post
    If you don't use a lot of strings buying reels of Seagar or other quality fluorocarbon line isn''t worth it. I would only want to use Seagar or other fluorocarbon line that was no older than a year or two. It goes bad. No serious fisherman will use last seasons line or leader.. We don't target salmon or other valuable game fish with last years line. Rockfish yes. Consider fluorocarbon line perishable. You can extend the life of line by sealing in airtight packs.
    Good to know. I will seal up my Worth and Fremont strings until use.

  7. #27
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    Is that a reaction to the strings being in water?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Smith View Post
    If you don't use a lot of strings buying reels of Seagar or other quality fluorocarbon line isn''t worth it. I would only want to use Seagar or other fluorocarbon line that was no older than a year or two. It goes bad. No serious fisherman will use last seasons line or leader.. We don't target salmon or other valuable game fish with last years line. Rockfish yes. Consider fluorocarbon line perishable. You can extend the life of line by sealing in airtight packs.
    I’m surprised. From what I’ve read PVDF fluorocarbon (fluorocarbon fishing line) is very inert and stable...

    PVDF exhibits an increased chemical resistance and compatibility among thermoplastic materials. PVDF is considered to have excellent / inert resistance to:

    • strong acids, weak acids,
    • ionic, salt solutions,
    • halogenated compounds,
    • hydrocarbons,
    • aromatic solvents,
    • aliphatic solvents,
    • oxidants,
    • weak bases.


    Polyvinylidene fluoride expresses inherent resistance characteristics in certain high-focus applications. Namely these are: ozone oxidation reactions, nuclear radiation, UV damage, and microbiological, fungus growth. PVDF's resistance to these conditions is fairly distinctive among thermoplastic materials. PVDF's carbon and fluoride elemental stability contributes to this resistance, as well as the polymeric integration of PVDF during its processing.
    Last edited by Doc_J; 07-08-2019 at 02:53 PM.
    -Hodge
    Humble strummer of fine ukes.

  9. #29
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    Jul 2012
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    I'm comforted to know Worth Browns will survive a nuclear attack. These will be my strings of choice whenever I venture into the Northern Hemisphere.
    Down at the bottom of the world this is not so much of an issue. So far.
    Miguel

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Howlett View Post
    Is that a reaction to the strings being in water?
    Air and UV
    Michael Smith
    Goat Rock Ukulele
    www.goatrockukulele.com

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