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Thread: Question on Cord Notation

  1. #1
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    Default Question on Cord Notation

    I'm looking at a piece written in the key of D. I see the following progressions noted: "Ds5 C#m-D G C#m-A G D," and "D G/E D As3 A-D."

    What do you think the "Ds5" and "As3" represent? I don't remember ever seeing an "s" used like that.

    Oops! Make that title: "Question on Chord Notation"
    Last edited by VegasGeorge; 07-08-2019 at 03:54 PM.
    "The sole cause of all human misery is the inability of people
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  2. #2
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    Could it refer to a scale degree being suspended or sustained between chords?

    Or does it mean to make that scale degree sharp? So in Ds5, play D-F#-A# ?

    Very curious to hear whaet others with more theory knowledge have to say!
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — 1918-19 Martin 2M Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


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  3. #3
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    Default

    Could "s" mean sus?

    John Colter.

  4. #4
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    I agree with John Colter's suggestion. That's what came to my mind as soon as I saw it.

    Ds5 - 3221 or 3225
    As3 - 2110

    Try them out in context and if they sound right they probably are right.

  5. #5
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    "sus" doesn't make sense to me as "sus5" and "sus3" make no sense.

    "sharp" doesn't make sense as "Ds5" would be better written Daug and "As3" would be Asus4

    "skip" ? so "Ds5" would just be D-F# and "As3" would just be A-E ? I dunno.

    Picture might help
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Flea soprano, C LW
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Bonanzalele concert
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127
    Pelem, A, EJ45LP

    !Flukutronic!

  6. #6
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    Last edited by VegasGeorge; 07-08-2019 at 01:07 PM.
    "The sole cause of all human misery is the inability of people
    to sit quietly in their rooms." - Blaise Pascal, 1670

  7. #7
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    I'm gonna stick with the "skip" idea. They are all leading chords so I'm thinking the idea is to just hit a couple of notes on the way between the other two. It's probably also very "idiosyncratic" to the specific player and instrument. In other words that's how that player did it. I'm sure you could come up with substitutions to simplify it for a uke transcription.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Flea soprano, C LW
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Bonanzalele concert
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127
    Pelem, A, EJ45LP

    !Flukutronic!

  8. #8
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    OK, I've sent Spike an invitation to join us, and let us know exactly what she means by her chord notations.

    Bad news! My email was returned as "undeliverable," and further research revealed that Spike died back in 2008. I guess discovery of the definative meaning of her chord notations is up to us.
    Last edited by VegasGeorge; 07-09-2019 at 07:31 AM. Reason: Further Information
    "The sole cause of all human misery is the inability of people
    to sit quietly in their rooms." - Blaise Pascal, 1670

  9. #9
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    Might just have to comb through the original JS Bach score to see what notes he has listed in those progressions.

    The arrangement makes sure to attribute the music to Bach, and even lists the work it came from. But the conductor’s score for that work—the St. Matthew Passion—has approximately 330 pages in the PDFs I’ve found...would be nice to know which section or movement it is from!
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — 1918-19 Martin 2M Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


    Mead Ambassador/Horticulturist at Heidrun Meadery since 2017

    Teaching Music Together since 2019

  10. #10
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    This is essentially the same melody and harmony as American Tune by Paul Simon.

    From Wikipedia, "American Tune" - The tune is based on a melody line from a
    chorale from Johann Sebastian Bach's St Matthew Passion, itself a reworking of an earlier secular song, "Mein G'müt ist mir verwirret," composed by Hans Leo Hassler.[3] The melody used for "American Tune" can be heard quite distinctly in part 1, number 21 and number 23 and in part 2, number 54. The melody to "American Tune" is similar to that of "Mein G'müt ist mir verwirret" and "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded," although Simon expanded on the tune. Listen to: https://youtu.be/s1GQIJqGvP4




    "The sole cause of all human misery is the inability of people
    to sit quietly in their rooms." - Blaise Pascal, 1670

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