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Thread: Capo Question...

  1. #1
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    Default Capo Question...

    Although this question is specific to my inexpensive nylon string guitar, I suppose it could apply to any guitar. If we place a capo at the first or second fret, does that eliminate concerns about imperfections in the way the nut was slotted, as the capo becomes the new "stopping point" for the strings? It seems like my nylon string guitar just performs better all around, when I put the capo on.

  2. #2
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    pretty much. nut issues could still potentially cause buzzes or make tuning more difficult even with the capo on but the capo will eliminate any nut action issues.
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  3. #3
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    On my CS-40 Yamaha I capo on second fret in order to have no buzzing of the strings. Using the capo on 1st fret on my Aria A 20-53 to avoid buzzing.
    Last edited by johnnysmash; 07-24-2019 at 08:59 PM.

  4. #4
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    Changing a nut is not that difficult if that is what is required.

    If you have buzz or prefer it when you use a capo then you have set up issues, and these can be solved.

    One of my Ukes has a zero fret which is akin to using a capo and that makes the tone far better of open played strings.
    Col.
    From the UK with a bad case of MIAS.
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  5. #5
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    Thanks for the thoughts, guys. I really appreciate them. I wonder if there are any nylon-string guitars with the zero-fret feature?

    I remember many years ago seeing a flamenco-style guitarist named Carlos Montoya on TV, and I was struck by the fact that he used a capo on the second fret. I always wondered if that might've been because it narrowed down his first-position width just enough to make playing more comfortable?

  6. #6
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    My friend says that he likes capo 3 for his finger size. I also feel that too. But capo changes tuning and scale length, I do not use capo for my comfort.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Sheehan View Post
    I wonder if there are any nylon-string guitars with the zero-fret feature?

    and I was struck by the fact that he used a capo on the second fret. I always wondered if that might've been because it narrowed down his first-position width just enough to make playing more comfortable?
    There must be, but I've never gone looking for one. I have a couple ukes by well respected makers with them.

    Using a capo will decrease your fret spacing and increase your finger spacing. Either could be a factor in playing comfort.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Flea soprano, C LW
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Bonanzalele concert
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127

    !Flukutronic!

  8. #8
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    Theoretically yes, but it makes the neck shorter and you may lose some intonation. It is much better to fix the problem than to live with a permanent band-aid.

  9. #9
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    Mosrite still have zero frets. The sound of open strings are same as fretted strings. And requires not much skill for nuts.

    Last edited by yahalele; 07-25-2019 at 12:44 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hanks View Post
    There must be, but I've never gone looking for one. I have a couple ukes by well respected makers with them.

    Using a capo will decrease your fret spacing and increase your finger spacing. Either could be a factor in playing comfort.
    Jim, you're exactly right, I hadn't realized that it would really be the decreased fret spacing (with capo on) that creates the sensation of a more comfortable "feel"; and the neck width (finger spacing) is in fact actually increasing slightly in that example, contrary to my initial assertion that it's decreasing.

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