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Thread: Low G for Kamaka Tenor

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Central Ohio
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    Fremont Soloist for low G is great; I use it on a concert size. Also get the Thomastik-Infeld CF 27 for your C string. https://www.stringsbymail.com/thomas...ound-2480.html

    Very little squeaking with both.
    Laura

    Haʻina ʻia mai ana ka puana

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by fretie View Post
    Humm... good idea about the Freemonts and never thought of going with the concert strings.
    I guess I figured concert strings, meant for a shorter neck, would be even tighter on a tenor size neck.
    That's my thought too...

    I've also heard of the fremont soloist recommended for concert size and for tenor...

    "For ukulele, I've found the Thomastik-Infeld CF30 chrome flatwound classical guitar string to be really great and has about 11-12lbs of tension which is what you'd need to have in order to approach decent intonation possibility.

    The Thomastik chrome flatwound strings are onsidered high-tension, AND to be just perfect for any time I wanted a low-G and also consider it to be significantly smoother than the Fremont Soloist, and with near-zero string noise.

    stringsbymail.com sells these as single strings - just search for CF30 and you will find them..." Booli
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins
    Concerts: Kanile'a K-2 CP - Living Water | Islander AC-4 - Living Water | Waverly Street banjolele - Worth Browns
    Tenor: Epiphone Hummingbird - Living Water low G
    UBass: Kala FS2 - Pahoehoe

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Gloucester, UK
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    It's a really weird quirk of tenor strings that they tend to be higher gauge than the smaller sizes for the same tuning. Completely counter-intuitive, especially if you come from a guitar background. I think somewhere on the old Southcoast site Dirk explained that the extra tension was needed to drive the soundboard a bit better on the larger instrument. This is very much from ancient memory for me so I may be way off!

  4. #14
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    Jul 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pirate Jim View Post
    It's a really weird quirk of tenor strings that they tend to be higher gauge than the smaller sizes for the same tuning. Completely counter-intuitive, especially if you come from a guitar background.
    Not at all. On a Jumbo or Dreadnaught sized guitar usually medium or heavy gauge strings are used, whereas on 000 or 0M or smaller sized guitars lights or extra lights are more appropriate, as they require much less tension and will be more comfortable at shorter scale.

  5. #15
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    Jul 2014
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    Gloucester, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by merlin666 View Post
    Not at all. On a Jumbo or Dreadnaught sized guitar usually medium or heavy gauge strings are used, whereas on 000 or 0M or smaller sized guitars lights or extra lights are more appropriate, as they require much less tension and will be more comfortable at shorter scale.
    And is that because more tension is needed to drive the larger soundboard? I feel like I'm finally understanding this!

  6. #16
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    Jul 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pirate Jim View Post
    And is that because more tension is needed to drive the larger soundboard? I feel like I'm finally understanding this!
    No, the tension required for a string to vibrate at a given frequency at is a function of string thickness, length, and of several specific material properties (such as density) of the string. If material, length, and frequency are the same then the tension gets higher as the string gets thicker. You can change the various characteristics and see the outcome in the cool d'Addario string tension calculator:

    http://stringtensionpro.com/Home

    A smaller instrument with thinner strings will be more bright, and an instrument with longer scale and a larger volume body can support thicker strings and be able to produce more lower frequency bassy sounds. I have a concert ukulele set up in CDGA tuning with two thick wound strings, that have fairly low tension and the small body is not able to make them sound good. That's why linear tuning with a low G is mainly used for tenor and larger bodies.

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