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Thread: If You Could Have Anyone Teach You

  1. #11
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    The ghost of George Harrison
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  2. #12

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    Really... I am surprised no one mentioned Taimane Gardner

  3. #13
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    The one, the only Sarah Maisel.

    (Oh wait. . . I already take lessons with her.)
    Last edited by PereBourik; 07-23-2019 at 11:34 AM.
    Why me?
    "Some people see the hand of God in their lives, some only the finger."
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  4. #14
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    Tobias Elof. I love his unique style. He's so good with using open strings and it gives him such a full sound. Plus he studied with James Hill so it would kinda be a two-for-one.
    Weymann Model 10 Mahogany Soprano (c. 1918)
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  5. #15
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    I'm too lazy to take lessons, but have friends that had great teachers.

    Ohta-San taught two of my friends from UKE groups. He sold one of his older ukes to one of them.

    Jake taught two of my good friends when he was in Pure Heart. They said that Jake would explain some stuff & they'd jam.

  6. #16
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    I’m starting to consider going for James Hill certification next year—not that it actually will help me earn or retain any teaching job, but that it will refine my own teaching as well as challenge some of my beliefs.

    As a educator, the belief that anyone can teach isn’t true (I’ve seen it over and over again), and even some high level conductors aren’t actually good teachers.

    I might also try UU+ in the future (and have considered The Ukulele Way). It’s a challenging thing to consider an instructional method to follow as I can already teach a good percentage of the material...but as with all of us, there are plenty of gaps to fill.
    My ukulele blog: http://ukestuff.info

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  7. #17
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    A great teacher and a great player are sometimes very different things. I know some amazing players who are terrible teachers. And vice versa.

    James Hill is the best of both, IMO.
    Brad Bordessa

    My guide to fretting and fingering (NEW): Left Hand Technique for 'Ukulele

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Bordessa View Post
    A great teacher and a great player are sometimes very different things. I know some amazing players who are terrible teachers. And vice versa.

    James Hill is the best of both, IMO.
    Actually, Brad Bordessa would be a pretty darn good teacher, too...
    My ukulele blog: http://ukestuff.info

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  9. #19
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    Having had short workshops at the NJ Uke Fest on a few different occasions with Lil' Rev, Sarah Maisel, and Danielle Ate the Sandwich, I would love to have longer term lessons from each of them, as well as with James Hill (who also taught Tobias Elof).

    Each of them have unique gifts that I feel would be of great benefit to me if I could learn and eventually re-master them as part of my own style.

    Also, I'd love to have a few sessions with Jake to discuss his approach to songwriting (having written my own songs on guitar for over 35 yrs, and ukulele for 6 yrs now) and have high esteem for both Jake's music as well as his technique.

    Of course, I also would like to try a few lessons from Jake too...

    Two others that really stand out for me are both Jim Beloff and Aaron Keim. I also love their styles of playing.

    There are also many other wonderful players out there, but I know not of their lessons availability, and unless there is an option for Skype/FaceTime, geography might be a limiting factor...
    Last edited by Booli; 07-25-2019 at 10:25 AM. Reason: typo -"occastions" when it should have been "occasions", fixed now :)

  10. #20
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    Hands down and geography notwithstanding, I'd choose face-to-face lessons with either Benny Chong or Byron Yasui.

    Being one of the very few face-to-face 'ukulele instructors in my region, I rely on Skype to connect with my own teachers. I currently study under The Uke Room proprietor Matt Stead via Skype (and am very satisfied, I might add), but I've also had particularly good lessons with Bryan Tolentino. Great teachers whose workshops I've attended include Kimo Hussey, Bryan Tolentino, and Daniel Ward.
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

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