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Thread: F# vs Gb

  1. #11
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    Coming from a piano-playing background, F# or Gb reads the same to me by itself. But that said, it's much easier for me to think about F#, I guess because that's how I usually see it in chord charts as well as in piano sheet music [I'm realizing now I've almost never had sheet music in Gb].

    The one that always confuses the heck out of me [even though it absolutely shouldn't], though, is A#. I know it's the same as Bb. I have no problem with it in sheet music. Reading chord charts/sheets, though I always get confused for a split second when I see A#, trying to remember what an A# chord looks like [whereas I don't have this problem when I read Bb].

    Even worse, it's always a piece in the key of F that I find A# written everywhere...

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by apdsqueaky View Post
    ....... [I'm realizing now I've almost never had sheet music in Gb].
    Yeah, certainly not something you see every day, although there are times where one finds it used. In my experiences, one often sees keys like that when playing shows, where the pieces were written in particular keys to suit the singer.
    Last edited by EDW; 08-03-2019 at 03:55 PM.

  3. #13
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    I love you guys. Where else can I go to discuss enharmonic matters? My wife puts on a good show for my sake, but I know she really doesn't care.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    I love you guys. Where else can I go to discuss enharmonic matters? My wife puts on a good show for my sake, but I know she really doesn't care.
    I feel ya. I love music theory-related discussions. No one else I know does. My SO isn't a musical person and so I can't even really bring up the subject. My musically trained best friend will politely listen to my rant of the day, but theory is just a means to an end for her.

  5. #15
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    "My wife puts on a good show for my sake, but I know she really doesn't care"

    TMI

    John Colter.

  6. #16
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    The names of chords/notes make only sense when we need read music.

    Myself in my loved songbook I have only a few in E/C#m or in Ab/Fm, but if I had some guitar oriented songs in their original, then yes more for sure in E.
    Or if from original brass/wind instruments, then more in 4 or more flat keys.
    Seldom if ever we see something we need to play from a sheet with F# and Gb. So in my opinion the names are not then that important.

    Important in what ever key we play, the basic knowledge is what are the 5 and 4 chords, and then the 6, 2 and 3 minor chords, the 3rd can be major too because of the harmonic minor. After that all gets more complicated with moods, secondary dominants, scales, music genres etc. Just makes the music so interesting as it is.

    Now keyboard players don’t have any so called movable chords. They have to know the above stuff as basics. And they have 10 fingers and we only 4.
    Our ukuleles because of the guitar inherited 4th, 3rd, 4th tuning are wonderful chording machines. Keyboardists can’t fake all our playing stuff with their 10 fingers at all

    Despite that shortcoming, the movable chords can do a lot with say an electric light action guitar. With acoustic instruments guitars and ukuleles, less so because the instruments, especially cheaper ones, will not sound so nice, in general, higher up the neck.

    This as added to my previous post.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 08-04-2019 at 01:26 AM.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDW View Post
    In the words of Steve Martin,





    I was asking for clarification, because there was also a reference to G#, which as a key signature does not exist. I wanted to be sure I was clear.

    There are plenty of times here that I have seen discussions about theory where various terms were used and terminology was confused.
    I beg to differ. The key of G# Major would have six sharps and one double-sharp, which is notated as a fancy ‘x’ (Fx in this case).

    Just because a key is impractical to look at or think of in terms of double-sharps or double-flats doesn’t mean that key doesn’t exist. I will grant that the complicated double-accidental keys are simply insane to look at.

    For example, I doubt anyone would ever write in the key of Cx Maj with its seven double-sharps, but it would be technically correct to do so...you’re just more likely to see the enharmonic key, D Maj, used.
    Last edited by YogiTom; 08-04-2019 at 04:38 AM.
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — 1918-19 Martin 2M Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


    Mead Ambassador/Horticulturist at Heidrun Meadery since 2017

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  8. #18
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    I suppose it exists in a theoretical sense or as a temporary modulation. One could likely create just about any key or time signature. My point was that in a practical sense, I never have seen this in any study of theory or over years of playing.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDW View Post
    I suppose it exists in a theoretical sense or as a temporary modulation. One could likely create just about any key or time signature. My point was that in a practical sense, I never have seen this in any study of theory or over years of playing.
    Agreed. I have been known to be a contrarian for the sake of argument.
    Current UAS fallout:

    Ohana SK-21A — ‘10s L. Nunes Ukulele 0 Hawaii Soprano — 1918-19 Martin 2M Soprano — ‘60s Kamaka ‘Keiki’ Soprano — ‘70s Kamaka White Label Soprano — Blue Frog Soprano — aNueNue Moon Bird US200 — Ohana SK-30L — Cocobolo Concert #382 (teak!) — Outdoor Ukulele Carbon Tenor — ‘50s Harmony Baritone


    Mead Ambassador/Horticulturist at Heidrun Meadery since 2017

    Teaching Music Together since 2019

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by YogiTom View Post
    Agreed. I have been known to be a contrarian for the sake of argument.


    That comment made my day!

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