Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Arthritis / Weak Hand Friction Peg Aid

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    919

    Default Arthritis / Weak Hand Friction Peg Aid

    One of my Ukes has friction pegs and I’ve grown to prefer them to the geared type (I find them so quick and simple to use). However I know that some people struggle with finger strength and / or arthritis and so find that they cannot use friction pegs.

    A long time back someone here mentioned Violin Peg Turners and that idea has been at the back of my mind waiting for use. (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Handcrafted.../dp/B00AM8T006). If you wish to make something functionally similar then a 6” length of some large doweling or old broom handle will do for raw material. At one end slot the dowel (along it’s length) to a width and depth to suit the tuner ‘button (I did something like 8.5 mm wide by 20 mm deep along the dowel length). You effectively have an open mortise into which the peg head slides. Grip the ’dowel’ lightly and twist very gently, it would be exceedingly easy to over tension a string or worse.

    I hope that my suggestion is a help to someone at some point.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 08-07-2019 at 06:43 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    One of my Ukes has friction pegs and I’ve grown to prefer them to the geared type (I find them so quick and simple to use). However I know that some people struggle with finger strength and / or arthritis and so find that they cannot use friction pegs.

    A long time back someone here mentioned Violin Peg Turners and that idea has been at the back of my mind waiting for use. (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Handcrafted.../dp/B00AM8T006). If you wish to make something functionally similar then a 6” length of some large doweling or old broom handle will do for raw material. At one end slot the dowel (along it’s length) to a width and depth to suit the tuner ‘button (I did something like 8.5 mm wide by 20 mm deep along the dowel length). You effectively have an open mortise into which the peg head slides. Grip the ’dowel’ lightly and twist very gently, it would be exceedingly easy to over tension a string or worse.

    I hope that my suggestion is a help to someone at some point.
    That's a great idea. I'll have to remember that. I run an assisted living, and though they don't play uke, I may be able to adapt that design for other things.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    If you wish to make something functionally similar then a 6” length of some large doweling or old broom handle will do for raw material. At one end slot the dowel (along it’s length) to a width and depth to suit the tuner ‘button (I did something like 8.5 mm wide by 20 mm deep along the dowel length). You effectively have an open mortise into which the peg head slides. Grip the ’dowel’ lightly and twist very gently, it would be exceedingly easy to over tension a string or worse.
    .
    Actually, it'll be EASIER not to over-tension. With those wee little tuner buttons, 1/16" movement at the periphery of the button is a significant change in string tension and it can take a pretty good grunt to get it moving. With a handle 6" long on the same button (just for example), a 1/16" movement at the end of the handle takes way less force (so you have better control) and it also makes a lot smaller change in string tension.

    Only problem with a simple dowel slotted on its side is that you're going to have to flip it back and forth when it starts to interfere with the other tuner buttons. But I would think it would take about 10 minutes to get used to that.

    In fact I think I'm going to make something like this for my wife who has a lot of trouble with the pegs on her violin.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    3,909

    Default

    I bought a bit that fits over the tuners and is designed to fit into an electric drill. I think it cost six bucks on ebay. It has a 1/4" hex shaft and fits into a stubby ratchet screwdriver. It works much like what you are describing except it has a ratcheting action that makes it easier to maintain a grip on. Just another idea.

    Tuner driver.jpg

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tuning-Guit...kAAOSwWzJdsAHJ
    Last edited by Rllink; 10-28-2019 at 06:30 AM.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
    Actually, it'll be EASIER not to over-tension. With those wee little tuner buttons, 1/16" movement at the periphery of the button is a significant change in string tension and it can take a pretty good grunt to get it moving. With a handle 6" long on the same button (just for example), a 1/16" movement at the end of the handle takes way less force (so you have better control) and it also makes a lot smaller change in string tension.

    Only problem with a simple dowel slotted on its side is that you're going to have to flip it back and forth when it starts to interfere with the other tuner buttons. But I would think it would take about 10 minutes to get used to that.

    In fact I think I'm going to make something like this for my wife who has a lot of trouble with the pegs on her violin.
    Perhaps my original post didn’t make matters crystal clear (sorry) but the axis of rotation of the tuning peg and of the turning handle (along its full length) are meant to be the same. Of course you ‘could’ use the handle at 90 degrees to the tuning peg / headstock large face but that wasn’t my intended use and I don’t recommend it. Grip the ’dowel’ lightly (so it lies within a lightly clenched fist) and twist IT very gently, it would be exceedingly easy to over tension a string - or break one - so use the minimum of force needed to do the job and do so slowly and carefully.

    The method of judging how far a tuning peg has been rotated is a personal choice. I leave a ‘surplus’ tail of about 3/4” long of string in (sticking out of) my tuning posts, for me that tail acts as a good indicator of rotational movement - just move a few degrees at a time.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 10-28-2019 at 10:18 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    Perhaps my original post didn’t make matters crystal clear (sorry) but the axis of rotation of the tuning peg and of the turning handle (along its full length) are meant to be the same. Of course you ‘could’ use the handle at 90 degrees to the tuning peg / headstock large face but that wasn’t my intended use and I don’t recommend it. Grip the ’dowel’ lightly (so it lies within a lightly clenched fist) and twist IT very gently, it would be exceedingly easy to over tension a string - or break one - so use the minimum of force needed to do the job and do so slowly and carefully.

    The method of judging how far a tuning peg has been rotated is a personal choice. I leave a ‘surplus’ tail of about 3/4” long of string in (sticking out of) my tuning posts, for me that tail acts as a good indicator of rotational movement - just move a few degrees at a time.
    If you're going to use it in the "coaxial" alignment, it occurs to me that a big file handle, or the handle from one of those multi-bit screwdrivers might provide even a bit more torque, as these are designed specifically for that operation. (you'd have to use a hacksaw to make the slot)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Cleveland Ohio
    Posts
    81

    Default

    I know that this is not the direction that the OP is headed, but I just have to say this. Gotoh tuners act like friction tuners but are so much easier.
    Yes, they are geared. But they retain the same orientation as friction tuners. Just a lot less force.
    Oscar-Schmidt Taropatch (1920)
    Cordoba Concert
    Oscar-Schmidt Soprano (1920)
    Cordoba Tenor (low G)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •