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Thread: Red oak/ white oak

  1. #11
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    Well said and I tend to agree with you. However, there is the famous (or infamous) "pallet guitar" built by Bob Taylor of Taylor Guitars which is said to sound great. His idea is that it is the construction process which makes a great sounding instrument, not the wood.

    The Pallet Guitar built out of oak. palletl guitar.jpg

    The story: http://www.guitaradventures.com/tayl...t-guitar-story

  2. #12
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    May 2015
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    Some nice looking oak guitars.





    And a 6 string uke I need to finish. Back, sides and fretboard are from a neighbor's oak tree.



    Bends well, used it for fretboards before with good success. With some live edge as a rosette.


  3. #13
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    Central Texas
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    Sequoia,

    You are absolutely correct.
    Last edited by Log Dog; 08-12-2019 at 08:59 PM.

  4. #14
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    printer..... I stand corrected Those are lovely.

    To the OP my apologies. I'll eat crow and admit that my problems with oak could have been more in design than wood. Best of luck with your builds.

  5. #15
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    My oak camp uke (pictured in the linked thread) sounds very good. And it has an oak top, as well as back and sides.

    I think other posts make it clear that oak can work well. But I suspect you need to choose it carefully (as you would for other building wood).

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
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    I purchased some QS Red Oak for a tenor from a fellow forum member. The wood arrived today, and I like the looks a lot. I'm thinking of turning the halves of the back so the knot "eyes" are incorporated into the body of the uke. I repackaged the pieces without all the tape and shrink wrap, and I'm going to keep it flat in my shop for a while to let it acclimate. I probably have another two months of work to finish my current twin uke project at the rate I'm going.

    I saw Beau Hannam demonstrating a CA pore filling method in a video. I think I'll take a piece of scrap from this wood and experiment with that once I start the build. I'm not planning to completely level the pores, but just give a good base to the final finish.

    Oak uke.jpg

  7. #17
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    A friend who is a luthier built a solid oak uke that I call the "oakulele". I think it sounds great, has a full range of tones, and good volume, plenty of sustain. He didn't tell me whether it was from a northern oak or a southern oak. It's on the heavy side.
    He also built one of solid pecan that sounds a little brighter. Both have glossy coats too.
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  8. #18
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    A friend who is a luthier built a solid oak uke that I call the "oakulele". I think it sounds great, has a full range of tones, and good volume, plenty of sustain. He didn't tell me whether it was from a northern oak or a southern oak. It's on the heavy side.
    He also built one of solid pecan that sounds a little brighter. Both have glossy coats too.
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyturley View Post
    I'm thinking of turning the halves of the back so the knot "eyes" are incorporated into the body of the uke.
    I would definitely keep the "eyes". Adds interest to the wood. If there is any question of stability, I would flood the knots with thin CA prior to sanding and building. Knots can be unstable as any wood worker knows.

  10. #20
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    Aug 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    I would definitely keep the "eyes". Adds interest to the wood. If there is any question of stability, I would flood the knots with thin CA prior to sanding and building. Knots can be unstable as any wood worker knows.
    That was exactly my plan. There's a guy named Howard Moore on a Facebook ukulele group who builds really nice ukes from unusual woods, and he often incorporates knotholes into his designs.

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