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Thread: Looking for a chart showing sheet music realtive to fretboard.

  1. #1
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    Default Looking for a chart showing sheet music realtive to fretboard.

    I want to pick melody from sheet music...need to transpose to the uke fretboard. Where can I find a chart showing this for a low G (GCEA) uke? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    If I understand correctly, you have some music in standard notation that you want to convert to tab.

    This sounds like a good time to learn enough notation to be able to at least decipher the notes and enough of the fretboard to then place them.

    The notes on the staff are in order (EFGABCDEF) and can be recognized by counting the lines (EGBDF - Every Good Boy Does Fine) or spaces (FACE) to see what you have, and then double checking for sharps or flats depending on the key. By the time you've copied out an entire song this way you'll probably have it pretty much down.

    Once you have the letter names, there are a bazillion fretboard charts available on your favourite search engine. If you know the names of the strings you can also start counting up as everything is in order (just watch out for B-C and E-F, which don't have a sharp/flat note in between them: A-A#-B-C-C#-D... E-F-F#-G-G#-A... C-D-E-F-F#... G-G#-A-A#-B-C...).

    You can also use software like MuseScore to convert: you can enter the notation into a standard ukulele staff and then copy it into a ukulele tab staff. You'll need to edit the G string for low G.

    Things to watch out for:

    • There isn't a one-to-one relationship between the two. Notes on the staff can be found in multiple places on the fretboard, and naive (or automated) conversion may not give the most playable position.
    • Even with the low G a lot of music written for other instruments can walk down off of the fretboard. You may need to transpose to a higher key or otherwise rearrange to make everything playable.

  3. #3
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    Arcy,
    Good stuff. I know quite a bit of what you say but certainly not all. Very helpful. I already know the fretboard but not standard music notation and that relationship. I just learned TAB and stayed there.
    JM

  4. #4
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    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Croaky Keith View Post
    +1 for Brad Bordessa's stuff.

  6. #6
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    Like Brad's info and especially like Honoka'a.

  7. #7
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    good as far as it goes but doesn't show Low G 4th string notes.
    Last edited by flailingfingers; 08-11-2019 at 02:39 PM.

  8. #8
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    GOT IT! Found it in my notes on music theory: "The Ukulele Way.com" Note Finder Chart for C6 TUNING with a chart at the bottom showing linear 4th string tuning.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by keod View Post
    Toolbox has jigs for both high and low g
    WHat/where is TOOLBOX?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    It could be a mistake to look for a magic chart. It may be better to look for a method.
    Many method books use simple childrens' music over about ten lessons to work from reading the open strings to getting the notes in the first five to seven frets.
    The first 10 lessons in old recorder books like those produced by Frida Dinn are very useful, you put a yellow stick note over the recorder fingering picture and draw on some Uke TAB. Many old uke tutor books have the same thing. I am not a fan of the internet offerings or more recent books for the task of learning to match the standard notation staff to a ukulele TAB staff. It is a mechanical process to program your brain, you start out doing it all by rote and over time that morphs into an understanding. Look for a very simple method, without fancy internet graphics or pretty colours.
    Sounds interesting. What books do you recommend?

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