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Thread: Help me understand the Baritone

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ukebebop View Post
    About 14 years ago I was a guitar player, struggling with the size of the guitar because of old injuries, when I met a music teacher in the course of business. We spoke about music & I mentioned my difficulty. He said I need a baritone uke. I'd never heard of one before. Now I own 2 of them. Their SIZE makes them a pleasure to play.
    That's why some people play baritone ukuleles!
    Yeah, the baritone ukulele feels just about "right" as a comfortable size for me to just sit and noodle with.
    Cordoba guilele
    Rebel N.E.O. tenor
    Birger Huber Baritone

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by acmespaceship View Post
    Lute is cool. Were you using moveable frets? I wonder how to translate that onto ukulele!
    The frets were the usual gut tied to the neck, yes, but I wasn't even remotely advanced enough to worry about any trickery with adjusting or tilting them. I struggled to keep the 10-11 strings (6 courses) with friction pegs in tune with variable temperature and humidity, and it was a student lute so the action was terrible anyway.
    Cordoba guilele
    Rebel N.E.O. tenor
    Birger Huber Baritone

  3. #33
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    Aug 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by fingerguy View Post

    Ugh! I will leave you all to discuss this for I feel only one maybe two get it. I'm out!
    The real question in my mind is: what’s the point of your question?
    A baritone is simply another version of ukulele that anybody well-versed in soprano ukulele can pick up and play using the same finger positions that they’ve learned even though they’re playing in a different key from that which they play on a ukulele in C tuning.
    If you want to play with others, learn the corresponding chords or slap on a capo.
    But I guess I just don’t “get it”.
    Last edited by Swamp Yankee; 08-13-2019 at 12:07 PM.
    Sopranos: aNueNue Khaya Mahogany 1, Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Martin C-1 (ca. 1947-1955); Musicguymic's Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

  4. #34
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    Amazing how many times this has come up just in the last two days:
    https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com...-Thinking-in-C
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Flea soprano, C LW
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127

    !Flukutronic!

  5. #35
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    Apr 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by hendulele View Post
    And then there's the tenor guitar ...
    Would that be an Irish Tenor?
    (That is a very poor attempt at a joke)
    🎶When Iím calling you-who-who-who🎶

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by fingerguy View Post
    So why would someone who wants to learn ukulele use one that differs greatly from the others past the sound difference?
    I didn’t read all the responses in this thread but I did re-read your original post. It appears that you don’t want to know the differences between a baritone and a tenor, but why someone would ever want to play a baritone since the chords are different. Yes, that is a different question.

    While I adhere to Jim Hanks’ position that if playing alone you don’t need to learn any new chords, I’m willing to guess most who play baritones with other ukuleles are able to easily adapt between the different tunings. It is fun to add a different dynamic to the sound with a baritone.

    I’m not sure if you are trying to drum up opposition to baritones, but the instrument is firmly entrenched as a ukulele.

    John

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
    While I adhere to Jim Hanks’ position that if playing alone you don’t need to learn any new chords, I’m willing to guess most who play baritones with other ukuleles are able to easily adapt between the different tunings. It is fun to add a different dynamic to the sound with a baritone.
    That's only half my position. The other half is that even if you're playing with others, you still don't to learn new chords - if you're willing to treat the baritone as a transposing instrument and re-write your chord sheets accordingly. Of course, that's not the only method, and if you focus on DGBE tuning, maybe you want *that* to be your "home base".
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Flea soprano, C LW
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127

    !Flukutronic!

  8. #38
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    Apr 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hanks View Post
    That's only half my position. The other half is that even if you're playing with others, you still don't to learn new chords - if you're willing to treat the baritone as a transposing instrument and re-write your chord sheets accordingly. Of course, that's not the only method, and if you focus on DGBE tuning, maybe you want *that* to be your "home base".
    I agree that transposing sheets in advance can crutch learning chords for a baritone. I hardly ever play guitar anymore, but when I play a baritone uke I use my guitar mindset and to play guitar chords. It sometimes takes a bit to jog the memory, but it is a lot easier, at least for me, than playing B or Bb tuning. In those cases I would need to use a capo or transpose the sheets. But in reality I have a tenor I’ve kept in C that I use.

    John

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by fingerguy View Post
    Group settings is what makes it matter. For instance I was part of a jam session and on average we had 2 Ukuleles, 2 to 3 acoustic guitars, and a bass. We all had to be in the same key. So if someone showed up with their Baritone and only know Ukulele shapes that key would not match.
    That's not how it works.
    Then does the acoustic guitar and bass guitar play chords using the exact same fingering as ukulele?
    They don't. You play the chord shapes/method the correct way for the respective instruments.

    Not everything revolves around ukulele's specific GCEA tuning.
    Guitars with their EADGBE tuning similar to Baritone is far more prevalent than Ukuleles.

    What you need to look at is not fixating on GCEA tuning as the centre of the universe, but realise that a musician needs to understand the universal concept of music. Chords are chords and are played differently on each instrument.

    If GCEA-ukulele players are playing a "C" chord, then the Baritone ukulele player also does a "C" chord as it would be on baritone (F-shape as a GCEA-ukulele user would do).
    Then they would be playing in the same key
    It would be ludicrously ignorant for the Baritone player to mindlessly play with other ukulele players using the exact same fingering and be in the wrong key as everyone else.
    Last edited by kissing; 08-14-2019 at 01:02 PM.

  10. #40
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    This thread has been frustrating but also entertaining to read. It makes me appreciate how fortunate I am to have a (minor) background in music. And by minor I mean minor. I played piano for a while before uke. I am mediocre at sight-reading on both uke and piano but get the basic concepts of music theory. What I appreciate from this thread is how the idea of transposing and keys is not intuitive to someone who maybe learned chords as positions on a uke.

    To me, even with my limited knowledge, the transition between sopranos and baritones never seemed hard to understand. I've always been satisfied to know that if I play the same song on a differently-tuned uke, it'll sound different but it'll sound like the same song, just either higher or lower. And if I care enough, I think it through and figure out what the chords I just played were.

    But other than that I'm satisfied to know I'm playing the same song in a different key. I think that would all seem more overwhelming to think about without a music background. When you have an idea of intervals - "oh this is just the same song but a few steps higher" - it doesn't seem like a big deal. But I think that if you dont have that concept in your head - "these are different chords now!" - it doesn't seem so simple.

    But, on the positive side, I think it's probably easy to learn the basics of music theory once you've been playing a uke for a little while.
    uke blog

    https://bennyukes.blogspot.com

    songs

    https://soundcloud.com/bennypaul

    videos (includes uke demos)

    http://youtube.com/user/theschumanity

    current ukes

    Wunderkammer "Boswell" Tenor, Keiki Kamaka Soprano, Johnson UK-200 baritone, Kiwaya Famous FLS-1G, Cordoba 24T

    former ukes

    Martin 1T, Martin Oliver Ditson Dreadnought Soprano, Martin Baritone, Ohana SK-28, Ohana SK-25S, Favilla Baritone, Kala KA-FMBG, Luna Great Wave Concert, Mainland Red Cedar Baritone, Mainland Classic Mahogany Tenor, Oscar Schmidt OU53, Oscar Schmidt OU57, Kiwaya Famous KTS-5 soprano, Ohana TK-38 tenor

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