Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 61

Thread: Help me understand the Baritone

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    20

    Default

    [Disclaimer, I am just a "plunker", not a music scholar. Please correct me if I am blatantly wrong]

    The term 'transposing" is a frightening to many, including me. I am too slow to transpose in real time, but I don't blame myself for that.

    As this applies to baritone vs. standard ukulele:

    Using the same finger positions, the baritone (DGBE) will sound a 5th lower in pitch than a standard (GCEA) ukulele. The baritone transposes standard ukulele notes to a 5th lower.

    Another transposing example:

    A Viola (CGDA) is tuned a 5th lower than a violin (GDAE) but the same fingering positions are used. The the longer scale (string) length of the viola "transposes" violin finger positions to sound a 5th lower.

    ---

    I, too, was frustrated with two instruments that play (finger) the same but "sound out" in a different key. My brain just doesn't work that way. It's just me.

    My workaround:

    After much experimenting, I finally determined that a concert scale ukulele can be strung the same as as a baritone, albeit with a re-entry D string. This allows me to use the same fingering on both instruments and get the same pitch (key) notes. There is no transposing.

    The strings I put on the concert are:

    E .029
    B .038
    G .029w
    Dr/e .036

    My noggin' is now at peace, as I can pick up the baritone or the concert and just play without thinking.

    ---

    In reality, I use CGBE (dropped D to Cr/e .034) tuning on both, but that is a different topic altogether.

    -Wiggy
    Last edited by Wiggy; 11-25-2019 at 05:18 AM.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Woodstock NY USA
    Posts
    491

    Default

    I donít know how I missed this thread when it first was posted, hereís my 2 cents: I had absolutely no interest in the baritone for years, first because I didnít know they even existed and then secondly because I told myself I would never want to learn new chords or whatever the heck was going on with baritones.

    But over a year ago I watched a video on HMS of Corey playing a Pono baritone. At the end of the sound sample he sighed with closed eyes and a blissful smile on his face listening to the sustain. I loved the sound, had store credit, and wanted very much to feel that bliss.

    I thought to myself if I have learned, and am still learning chords, whatís to stop me from learning more? I mean, am I so old my learning has to stop? Besides, I could return the bari if it didnít suit.

    Well, I play that baritone everyday. Itís not just the sound, itís that I found my key. I can sing in G. Yeah, I can do that on GCEA but the baritone helped me learn about the concept of keys. And the mind exercise of switching back and forth between different tunings is fun. The baritone can add to the sound of the group as others have stated. And when I am lazy and donít want to think about transposing, I just play the ole GCEA chords and see what happens.
    Last edited by Martinlover; 11-25-2019 at 04:36 AM.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    203

    Default

    www.southcoastukes.com/ti-open1.htm - Everything you need to know, but nothing you will ever read or even be able to comprehend.

    thread closed

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    the wild west, Canada
    Posts
    516

    Default

    Hmm, I'm late to the game here, but I'll add this as I didn't see it explicitly stated (probably was, but I skimmed through 40+ posts pretty quick!)
    And I get that the OP probably isn't reading anymore, but ...

    Yes, you need to use different chord shapes to play in the same key, but I don't think "You would have to learn totally different chord shapes." You'd already know all the chord shapes, they just correspond to different keys. I don't think there'd be brand new shapes to learn.

    From my experience, only playing soprano and baritone, the big difference is finger picking not always sounding right, but that is mostly to do with one being re-entrant and the other linear tuning.

    I don't play in groups, but if I did, I'd probably just bring my soprano.

    PS to Patrick Madsen - maybe we all played in D tuning in the 1970s, but I think that's rarely the case in BC anymore. Any ukulele shop I've been in has had their ukes tuned to C. Those British Columbians who actually play in groups, feel free to correct me!
    Glenn

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Kerrville, TX - Heart of the Fabulous Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    979

    Default

    For me, playing a standard strung Baritone is an exercise in sight transposition. The Bari is just a Ukulele in a different key. I grew up playing the French Horn. Historically, the Horn came in several keys, G Horn, C Horn, D Horn, etc. No valves, just different lengths of tubing. So, playing a modern French Horn, which is always in F, I had to learn to sight transpose old orchestra parts, such as written by baroque composers, in order to play the proper notes using my F Horn. Playing an F Horn, reading a D Horn part, I'd have to adjust for the key signature, and transpose down a 3rd, etc. The Baritone Ukulele is a G instrument, a fourth below, or fifth above the C tuning of the other Ukuleles. So, when playing the Baritone, when I see an E chord, I sight transpose it in my head to a B chord, and use the B fingering or chord shape that I'm familiar with on the other Ukuleles. I like this method, because I only have to keep in mind one set of Chord names/Chord shapes, that is, an F is always an F shape, a C is always a C shape, etc. Besides, the sight transposition is fun. Also note, that since the Baritone and the Island tunings are a 5th apart, if you know your Circle of Fifths, well then, there you go!
    Last edited by VegasGeorge; 11-25-2019 at 08:13 AM.
    "The sole cause of all human misery is the inability of people
    to sit quietly in their rooms." - Blaise Pascal, 1670

  6. #46
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,298

    Default

    Does anybody just put a capo on and play their baritone like a soprano/concert/tenor ukulele?
    Kamaka HF3, Tenor
    Martin S1, Soprano
    Ko'olau C1, Concert

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Abbotsford British Columbia Canada
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I have in a pinch when I cannot carry 2 instruments. I have yet to find a capo that lets me do this with comfort, so generally avoid it.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    3,974

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kkimura View Post
    Does anybody just put a capo on and play their baritone like a soprano/concert/tenor ukulele?
    So how far up the neck do you need to put the capo to turn it into a C tuned ukulele?
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  9. #49
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,298

    Default

    I don't really know. Five frets up? Maybe three frets? Help, help!
    Kamaka HF3, Tenor
    Martin S1, Soprano
    Ko'olau C1, Concert

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    272

    Default

    Capo on the fifth fret changes G tuning to C. But the fretboard becomes pretty short if you want to play anything other than first position chords.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •