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Thread: Shipping in the heat?!

  1. #11
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    Hi Gmoney,
    I tried to send you a PM, but your message box appears to be full. Let me know when you have cleared some space and I will resend my message.
    Thanks!
    Jan D.
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  2. #12
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    Jul 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjh42 View Post
    ...as per my brothers suggestion, I loosened the strings to relieve tension.
    Yes, that's a "must-do" for a traveling uke. Bumping around with tight strings puts a lot more pressure on the bridge.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  3. #13
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    Mar 2014
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    You kind of have to think about all of the extremes your ukulele goes through before it even gets to the retailer. I'm sure that the sweat shops in Asia where they are made are not maintained at an ideal temperature and humidity. Then they get shoved in an airplane hold or more likely a cargo container that sits on the deck of a ship as it makes its way across the pacific. Then it sets in a storage facility, maybe a warehouse. I used to live across the bay from a huge port, and those metal containers sit out in the tropical sun for weeks. Then it makes its way to the retailer by train, by semi, or again in the hold of a cargo plane. Finally it arrives at the retailer and sets for a while, who knows what the conditions are. I'm sure the retailer is the first place anyone gives it some thought, even if they do at all.. It is a wonder that any of them arrive alive and well. It gets sold. Then in the four or five days it travels from the retailer to the buyer, it somehow self destructs. I mean, I'm just thinking about it.
    Last edited by Rllink; 08-16-2019 at 08:15 AM.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    Then in the four or five days it travels from the retailer to the buyer, it somehow self destructs. I mean, I'm just thinking about it.
    Yes - good point.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  5. #15
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    Jul 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gmoney View Post
    I'm contemplating selling a few of my somewhat unused "stable" (I know, the HORROR!) and... though I'd like to make some of them available "anywhere" I'm really afraid to ship anything w/the current heat across the US. with just about any random shipment I get these days the items are physically overheated, so I can' imagine shipping one of these precious ukes in the heat.

    Any good packing tips to ASSURE that the uke won't be damaged by the heat while/if it travels?
    Foam - if you can find some leftovers from other shipments, put around on all sides, as thick as you can.
    "Polystyrene and plastic foam are both used as insulators as they have small air bubbles trapped inside them. This makes them very good insulators because heat energy can't flow through them. The same idea is used to keep the inside of buildings warm."
    "A Styrofoam cooler does a good job of keeping things cold because the material is a poor conductor of heat. ... Styrofoam has good insulating properties because it has millions of tiny air bubbles that slow the progress of heat through the material."
    Last edited by AQUATOPAZ; 08-16-2019 at 05:40 AM.

  6. #16
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    A little off topic but with all the talk of heat and humidity I thought about a parlor guitar I just bought that was built in 1896. It came from Ohio and existed back in the day of no air conditioning and poor heating. There is not one crack on this guitar. The top is spruce and the back and sides are rosewood. Just amazing it made it all this time without damage. I also have my grandfather's violin which was kept in an Iowa attic - I know because in the middle of the summer and at Christmas we would go to the attic to drag down the toys and would see the violin in its case. It was either stifling hot or freezing. The violin is also without damage.
    Were they made and finished differently then? Of course there are many damaged instruments from that time so maybe it was just luck.

  7. #17
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    Aug 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by 30svintage View Post
    A little off topic but with all the talk of heat and humidity I thought about a parlor guitar I just bought that was built in 1896.
    A very good point. How many early Martin ukes were coddled? Many have survived without warping or cracking.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjh42 View Post
    I recently traveled 900 plus miles one way and back with one my ukes, as per my brothers suggestion, I loosened the strings to relieve tension.
    If you do loosen your strings when you ship, I strongly suggest that you put some paper or a rag under the strings so that if they bounce around, they don't mar your fretboard or the body below the fretboard. Not as important if they are all-nylon strings, but a wound one could do some damage. Also something under the headstock to cushion it is a good idea.
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
    You can learn by reading, but you don’t begin to know until you begin to try to do.

    —Lou Churchill, Plane & Pilot Magazine

  9. #19
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    Jul 2019
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    I have ordered a few lately with the same concern. I shipped overnight with morning delivery. I think UPS morning is by 8:30am and fedex by 10:30am. More expensive but limits time in heat.

  10. #20
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    Jul 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wdh777 View Post
    I have ordered a few lately with the same concern. I shipped overnight with morning delivery. I think UPS morning is by 8:30am and fedex by 10:30am. More expensive but limits time in heat.
    That's what I've done if it was an expensive ukulele, and I had concerns about the weather, (too hot or too cold.) Yes, it's more expensive, but well worth it to me for an expensive ukulele in questionable weather.

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