Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 79

Thread: Season 393 - Are You Hep to the Jive?

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Villähde Finland
    Posts
    4,904

    Default

    HyperBob says: Scottish steel and Irish fire, that's the weapon I desire
    My Youtube Ukulele channel
    My Youtube Gardening channel

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Catalonia
    Posts
    2,438

    Default

    My contribution this week is my settings of a few very short songs from Russell Hoban's Dystopian Sci-Fi masterpiece "Riddley Walker". One of my favourite reads of the 1980s.
    The whole novel is written in an English that might have developed 2000 years after a new-clear war has devastated Inland (ex-England) and most of the world's population has returned to an iron age state.

    Like reading Cormac McCarthy's punctuation-less works, it takes a little getting into. But like C.Mc, you soon get into the swing of it and barely notice after a chapter or so.

    if you don't know the book, I thoroughly recommend it, along with almost everything Hoban wrote.

    Note the first songlet describes a spiral path around nine towns in Kent, which have all changed their names in the future Inland. Those of you familiar with Kent, see how many current place names you can guess from their future nomenclatures.

    The music I have come up with for these little pieces owes more to the Incredible String Band than hip, cool and hot jive. But I suppose that is Ok, isn't it?
    Hope you enjoy my little:


    Epiphone Les Paul (Red) Concert
    Kala KA FMTE - C (Low G)
    Steel Strung Hora Baritone
    Korala Baritone UKB 36
    Eugene Customised Tanglewood TU5 Baritone (High D)
    Yamaha GL1 Guitarlele
    Baritone Ukulele Banjo
    Oscar Schmidt 8 String Tenor
    Oscar Schmidt 6 String Tenor
    Jack Daniels Tenor - by Peavey
    Mainland Red Cedar Concert
    Korala Soprano Mahogany Electro Acoustic Cutaway
    Tenor Resonator Ukulele HB CLU 34-T
    Alida Electric Tenor
    Harley Benton CLU-Bass

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,463

    Default

    an original song for the season



    SLIPPERY LIP BLUES

    Honey I'm leavin', yeah I'll be makin' tracks
    Honey I'm leavin', yeah I'm makin' tracks
    Honey I'm leavin' here, but I'll be home someday

    All your jivin', made me flip my wig
    And left me slidin', on your slippery lips
    Honey I'm ridin' now, but I'll be home someday

    All your jivin', made me snap my cap
    I'm on the beam, with smoky joe in tack
    Ain't got the moxie now, but I'll be home someday

    Honey I'm leavin', yeah I'll be makin' tracks
    Honey I'm leavin', yeah I'm makin' tracks
    Honey I'm leavin' here, but I'll be home someday

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Portsmouth, UK
    Posts
    1,546

    Default

    Last one from me this week. This was released by Renato Carosone in 1947. It's in Italian, but if the comments on the original on YouTube are to be believed it's in a Neapolitan dialect that other Italians struggle to understand.

    I don't speak Italian, much less Neapolitan so apologies in advance for either mispronouncing or skipping over some words.

    Anyway. Its about a trend for post-war Neapolitans embracing American culture and leaving their own behind. But very tongue-in-cheek

    "Even on a cloudy day, I'll keep my eyes fixed on the sun"

    "But I heard voices, Not in the head, out in the air, they called to me. Through record speakers, through thick and thin, they found a shelter, beneath my skin"

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    306

    Default

    In Finland, the most famous slang is "stadin slangi" from Helsinki area. Historically, it contains many Swedish and Russian words, but nowadays the influence of English language is the strongest. This slang is not only spoken - the Finns have published comic books and classic poems, translated into "stadin slangi". Here is one example, a Finnish slang version of a Japanese poem by Taira no Kanemori:

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    127

    Default

    I am running behind on hosting duties because I got involved in fixing up a good chart for this song for Silly Dave. It was kind of tricky, so it took me much longer than I anticipated. Thanks for your patience, folks!


  7. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Sutherland Springs, Texas
    Posts
    2,156

    Default

    I asked several people who are much older than I am if they had ever heard the expression "she/he knows her/his onions," and none of them ever had. So I assume it is very long obsolete, or it was never in common usage in this part of the world. I looked it up in an online slang dictionary, and apparently it means that she knows what she is doing, has a plan, is intelligent, with it, etc.

    Never mind the words, just hum along and keep on going...

    YouTube UkeintheHeartofTexas

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,463

    Default

    thank you for this week Christopher.
    i think the last one from me.
    this, an improvisation on baritone, open D tuning.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Half-way up a hill in Southwest France
    Posts
    1,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanDP View Post
    I asked several people who are much older than I am if they had ever heard the expression "she/he knows her/his onions," and none of them ever had. So I assume it is very long obsolete, or it was never in common usage in this part of the world. I looked it up in an online slang dictionary, and apparently it means that she knows what she is doing, has a plan, is intelligent, with it, etc.

    Well, I've heard that expression and I'm not THAT old ... or maybe I am!!!
    "The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." George Bernard Shaw

    "Just remember, if we get caught ... you're deaf and I don't speak English."

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Oop North in England
    Posts
    5,712

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanDP View Post
    I asked several people who are much older than I am if they had ever heard the expression "she/he knows her/his onions," and none of them ever had. So I assume it is very long obsolete, or it was never in common usage in this part of the world. I looked it up in an online slang dictionary, and apparently it means that she knows what she is doing, has a plan, is intelligent, with it, etc. https://youtu.be/Ghzr00-b1sI
    I suspect most Brits on here will know it. It's an expression that I've heard and used most of my life. I'll see if I can find out more about its origins. I have a theory but it could be wildly wrong.
    Geoff Walker

    I have several ukuleles in various sizes and am not planning on getting any more...

    at least, not yet.

    I also play some blowy things and a squeezy thing

    Internet:
    You Tube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TootlinGeoff
    Soundcloud: http://soundcloud.com/tootlingeoff

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •