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Thread: Do you feel a teacher is necessary?

  1. #21

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    People have different learning styles. You may have a really good ear and are good at picking things up. some of us like me, not so much. This instrument is brand new to me and going into some privates with a bunch of questions has been incredibly helpful. I also found a group class who is great and really is good at helping people understand things. I'd been flaying around just doing scales and things, but not really figuring out rhythms, etc and feeling like I was getting anywhere.
    You must have a good ear for things as you mention being able to play multiple instruments. Figuring this one and the music, theory, moveable chords, etc, etc has been difficult (again, for me).
    Dancers take privates often. It's really helpful if you have the right teacher.
    I'm in the any knowledge is good school if it helps you out.

  2. #22
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    Whatever works for you according to what style you want to play, and to what level you want to play. I’d be inclined to say that even someone who doesn’t have lessons from a dedicated teacher is still learning from informal teachers...for example just listening to other musicians, in person at a gig or uke group gathering, or on cd/vinyl (whatever format you prefer...) you can absorb and learn from their playing. You can learn by sitting down and jamming with other players, regardless of whether or not their facility with the instrument is more advanced than your own. In that sense we can all be teachers and/or learners without even being aware of it

  3. #23
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    I've 'taught' at least 200 or so brand new ukulele beginners. Some brought in instruments still in the box. Some had been noodling for weeks, and only frustrated themselves. One in particular has been playing for three years, but lacks the confidence necessary to play like she wants to. Another has graduated to a one on one teaching experience with a way better player than I

    Everyone is different. Tommy Emanuel taught himself by listening to the radio. Many brilliant Classical players have several teachers. I had several horns teachers, and the last one was so horrible, well, I quit after seeing him thrice.
    I had 3 violin/fiddle teachers. None of them, try as they may, could teach me a thing.

    I feel like I have many teachers. There is usually something I can learn from almost any uker. Right now, my focus is on James Hill's Ukulele Way. I just learned some tricks from Lil Rev, in person.

    Learning and teaching can be planned, but sometimes learning and teaching happen spontaneously, out of nowhere.
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Russ View Post
    So after lots and lots of resistance to the idea, Ive realized teachers reduce the heartache and time required to understand and play things and give you a good path. And Id rather have that than say I taught myself the uke.
    "The self-taught man seldom knows anything accurately, and he does not know a tenth as much as he could have known if he had worked under teachers; and, besides, he brags, and is the means of fooling other thoughtless people into going and doing as he himself has done."
    -Mark Twain

    There are exceptions, but I think having a teacher is usually better than not. Is it necessary? Necessity implies impossibility (something is necessary if it's impossible without). I don't think anyone thinks it's impossible to learn without a teacher. Maybe a more helpful way to think about it is: is a teacher worth it? Which has a more complicated answer since time, money, and many other factors vary from person to person.

    I do think that people who brag about being self-taught might be doing a disservice to others who are thereby persuaded to do the same when having teachers could have worked better for them.

  5. #25
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    The environment has certainly changed much in recent years. If one does a series of online or youtube lessons, then one can argue that this can be equal or better than face to face lessons with a local teacher. Same if one joins a group. Currently I do not feel any need to take lessons as it would increase the pressure to practice and meet the teacher's expectations. It reminds me of childhood piano lessons where any sense of excitement and fun was squashed with the need to practice regularly and follow the teacher's curriculum.

    I do not argue that a teacher might not make me a better player or progress faster. I, however, think the tradeoff might be to decrease my enjoyment of playing. I do not expect to be a public performer, have nobody telling me to sit down and practice, and do not mind if I am not learning at a faster pace. I find songs and online lessons that interest me at that moment. Later when there is something specific that I want to master, I may seek out an instructor, but there is little upside that I could see to doing so at the moment.

  6. #26
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    Nov 2012
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    It depends. I had no real background as a string player. I didn't come from guitar but spent my professional playing days as a trumpeter.
    I bought my first uke around 2000 and just strummed and horsed around. I bought a Kamaka Tenor in 2013 with the intention of teaching myself finger style playing. I realized that I needed help but didn't know who or where to look for help.
    I was running errands one day and stopped at a Bed&Bath to buy shower curtains. Right next door was a Guitar Center and I walked in. I started talking to an employee and he happened to run the lesson dept. I asked if anyone taught ukulele. The person who did was in the store and I signed up. I studied for close to 3 years and learned so much that I don't think I would have learned on my own. Best thing I ever did in terms of learning the ukulele/

  7. #27
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    It depends on what sort of person one is. Some people like the structure and accountability that comes with a teacher and a curriculum. It has been my experience that those people feel that they are making efficient use of their time and learning quicker by keeping the course. Others are more freewheeling. The structure and accountability feels stifling. They prefer to take their time and explore wherever their journey takes them. They maybe are not in such a hurry. Which is better, from my observations neither method produces the "better player." But then I might ask, how do you measure the better player? Taste is so based on an individual's perception.

    I took singing lessons and I recommend them if one really wants to sing but maybe lacks in confidence. I also suggest that as soon as one is confident enough to go forth and sing, they quit taking voice lessons and go out and sing.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  8. #28
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    "The self-taught man seldom knows anything accurately, and he does not know a tenth as much as he could have known if he had worked under teachers ... " -Mark Twain.

    I actually find that quote to be very near the truth. Quite a lot of what I know has been self taught but when I am able to use a teacher I learn a lot more and much more quickly. When I first got a Uke it stayed in its box for some time, just didn’t get started until after my first lesson. Of course everyone is different but somewhere along the process of learning nearly everybody needs a teacher of some sort and I still take the occasional lesson - it all helps with progress.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 02-17-2020 at 03:21 AM.

  9. #29
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    I never got much from a formal teacher, really. I learned mostly from jamming with a group and yes, there was some teaching and lots of learning in those jams, but I could pick it up at my own speed.
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins
    Concerts: Kanile'a K-2 CP - Living Water | Islander AC-4 - Living Water | Waverly Street banjolele - Worth Browns
    Tenor: Epiphone Hummingbird - Living Water low G
    UBass: Kala FS2 - Pahoehoe

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowdenn View Post
    "The self-taught man seldom knows anything accurately, and he does not know a tenth as much as he could have known if he had worked under teachers; and, besides, he brags, and is the means of fooling other thoughtless people into going and doing as he himself has done."
    -Mark Twain
    I feel compelled to note, any quote from Mark Twain does not carry a lot of weight in my opinion.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

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