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Thread: Tips for maintaining a solid wood uke in 60-75% humidity climate (Australia)?

  1. #11
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    Jul 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by azairvine View Post
    I though the D'Addario Humdipak would do the trick as it is coined as a "two-way humidity control system"

    http://www.planetwaves.com/pwProduct...5-f267c3ac19b4

    But then toward the bottom of the page - "This product is not intended for de-humidification in high humidity environments."

    I'd already extended my budget a bit because I love the look and sound of the EUT-MAD, but it looks like the actual cost to maintain one will add a lot more to that.
    There's only so much you can do to fight Mother Nature. I use those D'Addario packs because of their two-way action, but I can understand how they wouldn't be able to reduce 75% humidity.

    An alternative might be silica drying packs. Whenever I get a product that has them packed in the box, I save them and put them in with cameras, lenses, and anything else that should be kept dry. A hygrometer would be essential to keep them from working too well.

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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Ames, Iowa
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    I lived for several years in San Juan, Puerto Rico, two blocks off the ocean. The average humidity is 76% and I never even thought about it. Really, I've found my ukuleles, even my solid wood ukuleles to be quite robust. I took one back and forth a number of times and another of my ukuleles lived down there for seven years. One problem that I had was with the tuners corroding, but that is probably due to the salt air from the breeze off the ocean, and not so much the humidity.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

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  3. #13

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    As a fellow Aussie, my advice is, don't worry about humidifying.
    Just keep your ukes in shade and in conditions that you would feel comfortable in.

    Solid wood ukuleles are not as prone to cracking as you may think. Australia has mild conditions towards instruments.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by kissing View Post
    As a fellow Aussie, my advice is, don't worry about humidifying.
    Just keep your ukes in shade and in conditions that you would feel comfortable in.

    Solid wood ukuleles are not as prone to cracking as you may think. Australia has mild conditions towards instruments.

    Thanks for the reply - but it's DEhumidifying. You're never going to need to humidify anything in Australia, our humidity just doesn't get that low. But a high humidity has the potential to swell the wood, bow the neck etc.

    But yeah, everyone I've talked to has said the same thing. Even my brother who is in SE Victoria said "The humidity isn't high enough" - little did he realise it averages in the 70s down there!

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by azairvine View Post
    Thanks for the reply - but it's DEhumidifying. You're never going to need to humidify anything in Australia, our humidity just doesn't get that low. But a high humidity has the potential to swell the wood, bow the neck etc.

    But yeah, everyone I've talked to has said the same thing. Even my brother who is in SE Victoria said "The humidity isn't high enough" - little did he realise it averages in the 70s down there!
    I don't think you need to dehumidify either as your humidity seems to range from mid60s-mid70s, which is actually considered the optimal range.
    Also given that "ideal" condition is considered 70% humidity.

    It's also not so much actual humidity level that's important, but abrupt and extreme changes in humidity that is a problem.
    Your ukulele should be kept in a somewhat constant environment where humidity does not fluctuate.
    The woods adapt and stabilise in your long term storage environment.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    I follow a Hervey Bay uke group on FaceBook, HUMPS. That is where your best source of advice on local conditions will be. Join the group and see what the others do. They also seem to be holding a simple festival in early October at Lake Monduran which would be a good place to find out about ukuleles.
    Was there last night

    Seems the consensus is no one really cares about the humidity! Though now I've noticed some mold growing on a door in here that I've ignored for the last few years. Who cares about a door? But if it happened to my uke......

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by azairvine View Post
    Was there last night

    Seems the consensus is no one really cares about the humidity! Though now I've noticed some mold growing on a door in here that I've ignored for the last few years. Who cares about a door? But if it happened to my uke......
    Mold would normally grow when it got contaminated by a specific aggressive mold and/or constant moisture exposure (not humidity alone).

    Mold would not grow on an ukulele simply because of ambient humidity.
    It rarely (or maybe never) happens.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Ames, Iowa
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    Quote Originally Posted by azairvine View Post
    Was there last night

    Seems the consensus is no one really cares about the humidity! Though now I've noticed some mold growing on a door in here that I've ignored for the last few years. Who cares about a door? But if it happened to my uke......
    In my travels I've found that a lot of ukulele people outside of our little UU community are a lot less concerned about certain things like setups and humidity. I think that we feed our own neurosis sometimes. As far as mold, at least in our place, it usually it showed up in places where there is no air circulation, like inside drawers and on the back of closet doors. I used to leave my ukes out where they got plenty of breeze and had no problems, other than salt air corroding the tuners.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  9. #19
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    Dec 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    In my travels I've found that a lot of ukulele people outside of our little UU community are a lot less concerned about certain things like setups and humidity. I think that we feed our own neurosis sometimes. As far as mold, at least in our place, it usually it showed up in places where there is no air circulation, like inside drawers and on the back of closet doors. I used to leave my ukes out where they got plenty of breeze and had no problems, other than salt air corroding the tuners.
    Same here. It’s called ukulele “underground” for a good reason. Apparently what’s common here is not so common elsewhere. They give you the look if you start talking about the difference between 34.5mm and 35mm nut width.
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  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    As far as mold, at least in our place, it usually it showed up in places where there is no air circulation, like inside drawers and on the back of closet doors. I used to leave my ukes out where they got plenty of breeze and had no problems, other than salt air corroding the tuners.
    Now I dunno whether I should leave it zipped up in the soft case, or out in the air! Well at least when it's getting played it'll definitely be out in the air so I guess that ticks that box!

    Quote Originally Posted by AustinHing View Post
    Same here. It’s called ukulele “underground” for a good reason. Apparently what’s common here is not so common elsewhere. They give you the look if you start talking about the difference between 34.5mm and 35mm nut width.
    Funny you should say that. My mate just started playing uke and bought one at the local shop. I asked him if they'd set it up and he was like, "well....surely they would have.....they're a shop". Then I started talking about action and the nut and saddle, and I was going to measure the string heights when I visited. Got there and he was like, "nahhhhhhhhh". He's quite happy with what he's got and doesn't want to bother about such silly things

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