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Thread: Hand plane recommondation for thicknessing

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    central CA
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    After reading a thread by Pete Howlett some years ago I bought an old Stanley No. 5 and there are some jobs that the hand planes do really well. I have a whole stable full now from the brass thumb planes to the No. 5. I put a Ron Hock blade and chip breaker in the No. 5 and it's marvelous. The rest are just factory.
    This is information I probably wouldn't have gotten any where else but here.
    My Real name is Terry Harris

  2. #12
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    Jan 2013
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    Honolulu/Hawaii
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    just found out my buddy has a dewalt planer. will this work for thicknessing. from a youtube video you can go down as thin as venner with a sled.

    should I bookmatch(Glue) the thicker board first then plane it down or, thin first then bookmatch them together?

    3AB12_AS01.jpg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzxK571Wz1s

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Little River, California
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    I would bookmatch first and then thin if you have enough room. Thinning with a planer can be problematic. You can end up with a lot of match wood. Good luck and send pix of results.

  4. #14
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangimango View Post
    looking for my first handplane.
    wanting to thickness 4.5mm figured tops to 2.5 then hand scrap or sand smooth.

    should i get a NO.4 or NO.5 jack planes? low angle jack? block planes?

    any tips thanks in advance
    You can find out what Liam Kirby uses. He does all his by hand. http://www.wunderkammerinstruments.co.uk

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    New Westminster BC Canada
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    I have that planer and it works very well for thinning clear straight grained pieces down to less than 2mm, as others have said you have to be very careful with figured, curly grained wood as it can reduce it to matchsticks if you go much thinner than 4 mm. I move from the planer at 3-4 mm and then worry it down to the correct thickness on a drum sander
    Last edited by cathouse willy; 09-14-2019 at 07:44 AM.

  6. #16

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    A planer can cause tearout in even the thickest figured boards, but this problem is compounded when the chips that are torn our become a significant part of the thickness of the wood. Take thin passes, and feed it slowly if the feed rate is adjustable. If you have a fancy, expensive piece of wood, I'd stop using the power planer and switch to a hand plane or sander once you notice any sign of vibration in the piece being planed.

    Let us know how it turns out,

    John

  7. #17

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    To hopefully save you some grief if you hand plane it- don’t plane into a stop the way you would on thicker stock. Clamp it at one end and plane away from the clamp.

    Honestly, if you're not in production, hand planing it down from a ” board doesn’t take that long. I wouldn’t bother with a planer.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    thanks for all the info.

    I was also thinking of making a router plane jig to thickness.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0H1C3AiFrw

    does this method create tear outs or 2mm thin not possible?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Bouchard View Post
    To hopefully save you some grief if you hand plane it- don’t plane into a stop the way you would on thicker stock. Clamp it at one end and plane away from the clamp.

    Honestly, if you're not in production, hand planing it down from a ” board doesn’t take that long. I wouldn’t bother with a planer.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    UK
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    It really is quite a quick process once you've developed the knack of hand planing. But I'd get a couple of scrap boards and practice on those first.

    My technique, about 50 ukes in to building is to clamp the board down with two clamps and plane at 45% to the grain in three stages:

    1. A clamp at the LH corner and about 1/3 way from that corner, and plane the RH side of the board.

    2. A clamp at both LH and RH corners, plane the middle.

    3. A clamp at the RH corner and one about 1/3 way from that corner, plane the LH side.

    For the next pass I rotate the board 180 degrees so I'm planing in the opposite direction.

    I use three planes for a soprano board: a smoother set to take a thick shaving, which has a steep camber on the blade; a smoother set for a fine shaving which has very little camber; and a block plane. As I get closer to final thickness I switch from the thick shaving to the thin shaving smoother, then finish off with the block plane. But you don't need the block plane, I just find it handy to creep up in the final thickness taking small shavings.

    Rather than try to plane along the grain direction, which risks the plate buckling as you push the plane, I finish off with a hand held cabinet scraper.

  10. #20

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    As far as hand planes go I have used all of the mentioned above and if I were to say either No. 4 or No. 5 I would say the No.4 as it is smaller which makes it easier to wield .....besides if you are willing to clean it up , true the iron and sharpen it, you can usually get them used REALLY cheap in comparison...

    I would be real careful if you choose to use that planer as even straight grained wood can get dicey near target thickness... I have done it and gotten away with it...but I also have not and not only is the piece ruined but it is a bunch of splinters of wood flying across the shop....Be safe!

    Hand planes are very easy to use if you have them trued & tuned up, sharp and a basic handle on how to use them...make yourself a stop/shooting board and rotate/flip after equal passes...check your thickness across the board while flipping / rotating and make adjustments in your passes based on that data.....get close to target thickness with some extra to spare, join the boards and sand or scrape the rest (a oscillating sander works well for that last leveling after joining).....It does not take long and is quite enjoyable actually.

    The other thing that can be helpful is to place the wood on some stickers and put weight on them afterward to let the now thickness-ed boards settle...if your humidity is consistent and the wood is well seasoned all should be fine but better to be safe and let them settle straight.....I have seen wood turn into a curved up potato chip because some one did not do this and the humidity shifted after thicknessing.....In technical jargon that would be referred to as a real bummer!

    Easier than you think and does not take long.....just take your time and make sure it is sharp and remove material as evenly as possible!

    You got this!

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