View Poll Results: Would you rather...

Voters
44. You may not vote on this poll
  • Buy Vintage 90-100 year old Martin in great condition

    4 9.09%
  • Buy 100 year Kamaka or 100 year Martin or some other commemorative model

    2 4.55%
  • Buy the latest and greatest production model

    12 27.27%
  • Save money toward the purchase of a Custom

    26 59.09%
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Would you rather?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    320

    Default Would you rather?

    Let's make a few assumptions:

    You have a sizeable (more than 5 less than 15) number of ukuleles.

    You are generally happy with your instruments with a tenor that you already enjoy playing.

    You have UAS, nonetheless.

    You mostly play tenor, but also can play concert sizes. You rarely play soprano.

    You have kids and someday you may pass some or all of these instruments on to them...

    All instrument choices below cost the same money:

    1. buy a vintage nearly 100 year old Martin soprano in really nice condition.

    2. buy a 100 year anniversary Kamaka or 100 year anniversary Martin (or some other commemorative model, e.g. 100 year old Kiwaya)

    3. buy a 2018/2019 tenor high end production (like new KoAloha, Kamaka, K'anilea, Anuenue, etc.).

    4. save your money toward a custom in the future.

    Clearly the vintage Martin soprano is the choice if you value collecting or want an instrument with some history. On eBay a few weeks ago, there was this awesome vintage Kamaka that had a cigar band on the tail which placed it at around 95-100 years ago. It went for more than I was willing to pay, but how neat of an instrument would that be?

    The 100 year anniversary Kamaka or Martin is a nice commemorative instrument, but I don't know if being a 100 year anniversary model really adds to the collectability or not. Does a 2018/2019 newer model have better upgrades or better build quality or technology? It seems like every year they come out with something new to tweak the sound a bit. KoAloha re-shaping the uke and moving the bridge; K'anilea using new Tru-er bracing (if that's the term), Kamaka tweaking finishes, etc.

    The Custom option would be great, but wow, the prices for those are super expensive. Also, 20 years from now, are people going to remember that [name a builder] brand ukulele or would they rather have a more mainstream brand? I feel like a few builders might have that name recognition in the future, but it's hard to say with any certainty (I am not intending to start any wars-all custom builders make fantastic instruments and it would be a joy to own and play any of them).

    (I'm asking for a friend, I assure you...)

    Cheers!
    Last edited by ghostrdr; 09-11-2019 at 12:48 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sewell, NJ (suburb of Philadelphia, Pa)
    Posts
    599

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrdr View Post
    Let's make a few assumptions:

    You have a sizeable (more than 5 less than 15) number of ukuleles.

    You are generally happy with your instruments with a tenor that you already enjoy playing.

    You have UAS, nonetheless.

    You mostly play tenor, but also can play concert sizes. You rarely play soprano.

    You have kids and someday you may pass some or all of these instruments on to them...

    All instrument choices below cost the same money:

    1. buy a vintage nearly 100 year old Martin soprano in really nice condition.

    2. buy a 100 year anniversary Kamaka or 100 year anniversary Martin (or some other commemorative model, e.g. 100 year old Kiwaya)

    3. buy a 2018/2019 tenor high end production (like new KoAloha, Kamaka, K'anilea, Anuenue, etc.).

    4. save your money toward a custom in the future.

    Clearly the vintage Martin soprano is the choice if you value collecting or want an instrument with some history. On eBay a few weeks ago, there was this awesome vintage Kamaka that had a cigar band on the tail which placed it at around 95-100 years ago. It went for more than I was willing to pay, but how neat of an instrument would that be?

    The 100 year anniversary Kamaka or Martin is a nice commemorative instrument, but I don't know if being a 100 year anniversary model really adds to the collectability or not. Does a 2018/2019 newer model have better upgrades or better build quality or technology? It seems like every year they come out with something new to tweak the sound a bit. KoAloha re-shaping the uke and moving the bridge; K'anilea using new Tru-er bracing (if that's the term), Kamaka tweaking finishes, etc.

    The Custom option would be great, but wow, the prices for those are super expensive. Also, 20 years from now, are people going to remember that [name a builder] brand ukulele or would they rather have a more mainstream brand? I feel like a few builders might have that name recognition in the future, but it's hard to say with any certainty (I am not intending to start any wars-all custom builders make fantastic instruments and it would be a joy to own and play any of them).

    (I'm asking for a friend, I assure you...)

    Cheers!
    Okay-- so just a few minutes ago I listed on ebay and reverb my "almost 100 year old vintage 1920's Martin Style 2 soprano. I may take it down.

    My kids don't want my ukuleles. I had a 1979 Kamaka 8-string that I got at the Kamaka Factory from Sam Kamaka. I was saving it for my kids. Nobody showed any interest. I sold it.

    I have a number of 2019 high end productions

    I have a more recent Kamaka and am very happy with it.

    The only custom I would want is a Moore Bettah and I doubt I will ever own one, nor should I save for one.

    So, the question is that Vintage Martin I put up for sale. Should I keep or sell it? don't know
    Last edited by efiscella; 09-11-2019 at 01:24 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
    Posts
    4,546

    Default

    Given your assumptions I'd pick the third option - latest production. If it were me personally I'd say the 4th option, but you should never get a custom unless you know you should. And I wouldn't get a custom with resale in mind.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Flea soprano, C LW
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Bonanzalele concert
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127

    !Flukutronic!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by efiscella View Post
    Okay-- so just a few minutes ago I listed on ebay and reverb my "almost 100 year old vintage 1920's Martin Style 2 soprano. I may take it down.

    My kids don't want my ukuleles. I had a 1979 Kamaka 8-string that I got at the Kamaka Factory from Sam Kamaka. I was saving it for my kids. Nobody showed any interest. I sold it.

    I have a number of 2019 high end productions

    I have a more recent Kamaka and am very happy with it.

    The only custom I would want is a Moore Bettah and I doubt I will ever own one, nor should I save for one.

    So, the question is that Vintage Martin I put up for sale. Should I keep or sell it? don't know
    Did you take it down? I guess there's a part of me that thinks when I pass on, my kids will maybe hold a few of my instruments and think I remember when my dad used to make those awful noises on this growing up. . So, I guess it doesn't make sense to buy instruments for your kids and we should buy and sell stuff because we want it or want to play it or are ready to move on from it.

    There's a part collector of me that loves to figure out the history and a 100 year old Martin no doubt has some stories to tell.

    As to Jim's remarks, I don't know if I should get a custom, but it concerns me that the waiting period is often 12-24 months!

    I guess I have a lot of info to pass on to my "friend." heh

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sewell, NJ (suburb of Philadelphia, Pa)
    Posts
    599

    Default

    I have not taken The Vintage Martin down, yet. I have been emotionally attached to all of my ukes and their stories, but I have found that it is just too much. I have owned many firsts and prototypes but there is the question of space and money. I am trying to let go. I had a Star Spangled Banger soprano made by Alvin Okami. I have had it for a few years and decided to sell it. The buyer loved it and posted a great review on facebook. I copied the review and sent it to Pops. Alvin wrote back to me that this person certainly bought himself a collectors item and that he (Pops) himself did not even keep a single model of this design for himself. So, my thought was "Wow, maybe I should not sell these prototypes that I have?" yea- I just don't know.

    AS for the vintage martin that I put up for sale, months ago, I saw it on ebay and put in a modest bid. It was fair-- not too high, and not real low either. I put it in and forgot about it. One day, a week or so later, I woke up to a message that I had won the auction. I had not even been following. I asked the seller the story and they said that it was found in the back of a closet in an estate sale in North Carolina. Also that nobody in the family has any idea of this ukulele and never saw it played. I love that story.

    Oh well, and I am sure that there will be ukulele for my kids and it will be the ones I play the most

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Sparta, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,314

    Default

    Unless you are a real expert on ukuleles. You know the markets and enjoy buy and selling ukes, you should not buy for an investment. The demand goes up and down. What's hot one year may not be hot years later. With few exceptions, what seems to be a sure thing for gaining in value may tank and leave you very disappointed. Or you may make money on one but lose your shirt on another.

    Buy these instruments for what they are.
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
    You can learn by reading, but you don’t begin to know until you begin to try to do.

    —Lou Churchill, Plane & Pilot Magazine

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ma., Ga., Fl.
    Posts
    2,092

    Default

    At this point, needing really nothing uke wise, a very specific, yet to be determined custom. On the other hand, I do buy and repair damaged instruments.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
    Posts
    5,969

    Default

    (I'm asking for a friend, I assure you...)
    Well tell your friend his/her money is best spent on a high grade readily available quality uke.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    3,840

    Default

    Maybe this poll does not apply to me as none of the options really reflect my interests in ukuleles. I also only fit the requirement of five ukuleles by counting my cigar box uke that I built and is absolutely worthless for anything other than a conversation piece. But because it is mentioned, bequeathing my ukuleles is not something that guides my purchases. It intrigues me that someone is attached to their ukuleles to the extent that they expressly want to pass them on to loved ones. I mean, I accept the concept as I have been bequeathed a lot of things recently, but none of which I wanted and I feel kind of sad that someone has given me all of these things because they meant so much to them and they mean so little to me, one thing in particular. But the conversation over the subject caused me to reflect, so I thought that I would comment on it. Anyway, I will not be bequeathing my ukes. If my kids want them they can take them. If they don't they can sell them and pocket the money. That goes for everything I have. Makes no difference to me.
    Last edited by Rllink; 09-12-2019 at 04:11 AM.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    2,141

    Default

    As much as I would enjoy a good condition 90-100 year-old Martin, it will still be an aged instrument.
    so my vote went to the latest, greatest production model - in my case a Blackbird Clara.

    I want something resilient and not fragile.

    RE: Custom, even for the same price... right now I prefer the concept of eKoa vs wood construction.
    I'm sure the Custom would be fantastic, but I might feel intimidated by the fact that it would be a
    Custom-built uke. I suppose I'm not used to some of the 'finer' things in life. My exclusive Men's
    Stores are Goodwill and Savers/Value Village

    keep uke'in',
    Uncle Rod Higuchi
    ( rohiguchi@seattleschools.org )

    MP3s: http://www.mediafire.com/?50db7nls4o6m6
    Ukulele Boot Camp, FREE Songbook, Holiday, Hawaiian & More: http://ukulelebootcamp.weebly.com
    Crazy G tutorial on YouTube ( uncle rod crazy g )
    pdf file for Crazy G:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/0o6id06c06...20TAB.pdf?dl=0

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