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Thread: "Faux" Triplet Strum

  1. #11
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    Thanks, John! Kimo is a great player and a great teacher!

  2. #12
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    Aug 2017
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    I use the all finger strum when I do triplet strums. Downstroke with four fingers slightly apart and lightly curled. Follow this with a downstroke with the pad of the thumb. Follow this with an upstroke with the back of the thumbnail and end the triplet with another downstroke, four fingers, lightly curled. The trick to getting it smooth for me is to keep the hand close in to the uke so that your palm is parallel to the top of the uke. That gives me the light touch I’m looking for. The volume comes from having longer nails.
    It’s become second nature for me, and I goof around sometimes playing songs entirely with triplet strums... but it’s best used, I believe, infrequently for accenting certain parts of songs.
    Sopranos: aNueNue Khaya Mahogany 1, Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Martin C-1 (ca. 1947-1955); Musicguymic's Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

  3. #13
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    You know what might help with learning... hold your strumming hand like a pistol, thumb up, index finger straight but relaxed, don’t clamp your other fingers tightly.
    In this position, note how the middle, ring and pinkie fingers are lightly curled.
    Now, with your palm parallel to the top, keeping the pistol shape, strum down with the middle, ring and pinkie as a unit, leaving the index pointing out, then follow with a downstroke with the thumb, an upstroke with the thumb, and a final downstroke with the three fingers. ...all while maintaining the pistol position.
    This pistol position will give you the proper separation between the thumb and other fingers that you need to execute the strum. As you hardwire the strum, you can lose the pistol position as you see fit, although it looks pretty cool anyway
    Last edited by Swamp Yankee; 10-11-2019 at 04:04 AM.
    Sopranos: aNueNue Khaya Mahogany 1, Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Martin C-1 (ca. 1947-1955); Musicguymic's Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

  4. #14
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    Thanks, S. Y., and sorry for the delay in responding! I had been away for a while and forgot to check this thread! I will incorporate your suggestions into my practice and see how it goes!

  5. #15
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    play it as slowly as you must in order to master it. Speed comes with proficiency..you cannot "expedite" the process.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilUSAFRet View Post
    play it as slowly as you must in order to master it. Speed comes with proficiency..you cannot "expedite" the process.
    A great and much appreciated reminder! I have resolved to do it slowly and to think long-term!

  7. #17
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    Calling downstrokes 'D', upstrokes 'U', finger 'F' & thumb 'T', I don't think it matters whether you play your triplets DF-DT-UF (Kimo I), DF-DT-UT, UF-DF-DT (Kimo II) DT-UT-UF (Jake) or any other combination of up/downstrokes.

    Technique is secondary to counting: i.e., thinking of a triplet not as 3 beats but as 4: da-da-da dah. The 'dah' establishes the beat that's being broken into 3 by the 'da-da-da's. Without it, you're just playing a fast waltz.
    That 'dah' is almost always played as a downbeat. So: DF-DT-UF DF; DF-DT-UT DF; DT-UT-UF DF (and so forth). Only using the Kimo-II technique would you have to end on an upstroke: UF-DF-DT UF.

    And of course, go as slow as you can to get it right. Once you have, then you can play as many triplets in a row as you like - just so long as you end on that dah: da-da-da da-da-da da-da-da dah!
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