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Thread: Considering an N. American custom build for an inept strummer

  1. #11

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    I appreciate the time you took to share your thoughts. I will read and listen and think around it all, but even right now - I know a little more than I did before

  2. #12

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    Kerneltime - if you have the time, I have another question.

    I have spent an evening reading the internet lol.

    Could you elaborate on how the steel string building tradition differs from the flamenco and heavy back and sides thing top (Australian school?) of building wrt ukes?
    How does a steel string inspired build differ in broad strokes? Would it have a less strong attack and thus sound less punchy or am I completely misreading this.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    903

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    Quote Originally Posted by steveholt View Post
    Kerneltime - if you have the time, I have another question.

    I have spent an evening reading the internet lol.

    Could you elaborate on how the steel string building tradition differs from the flamenco and heavy back and sides thing top (Australian school?) of building wrt ukes?
    How does a steel string inspired build differ in broad strokes? Would it have a less strong attack and thus sound less punchy or am I completely misreading this.
    Take a look at these videos to see sound samples
    https://youtu.be/jWqkbp1KfEo
    https://youtu.be/R0Op1elrMsc
    The main difference I felt when playing was string tension. This is true for all ukes, certain top like lighter string tension others like a heavier one, you will find a lot of threads here talking about tuning up or down a uke to make it sound better or changing strings..

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    1

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    In the Northwest, you may want to also check out Brian Griffin at griffinukuleles.com. He is in Bellingham, WA, just north of Seattle. On his web page, you can follow his daily build progress on customer's orders, see some of his past builds and read the stories behind his favorite top woods. If nothing else, it will give you an appreciation for the craftsmanship that goes into a build. I've only been trying to get my fingers to strum for a few months, but thoroughly enjoy learning on one of his concerts.

  5. #15

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    Thanks for the recommendation. Ill check Brian out.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Salem,Oregon
    Posts
    1,273

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    I was blessed with a weekend with Les Stansell and Kimo Hussey in centrally isolated Pistol River,Oregon. Les showed us his range of woods--which he sends to others as well as uses it himself. I wonder how many other makers put the bracings on one small piece at a time rather than a slotted strip which flexes. He uses hot hide glue rather than cold poly glue. Hot glue has a rigidity that passes on string vibration that poly glue absorbs. The way he tapers the bottom edges of the sides is something to behold. My grade 4A Myrtlewood TENOR is 26" tip to tip compared to my 2 Brazillian made Giannini ukuleles at 30" top to tip. Kimo came from Hawaii to pick out his ukulele. Les also uses the lightweight 4:1 tuners called PEGHEDS rather than the heavy metal tuners that are 12:1. The balance difference is really noticeable. There are also two brothers along the I-5 corridor who make Covered Bridge brand ukuleles. They look, sound, and play really nicely.

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