Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Lyle Ritz solos book

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Blackburn, UK
    Posts
    43

    Default Lyle Ritz solos book

    I've just got the Ukulele Masters, Lyle Ritz Solos book but I don't understand the way the music is written out. It has the melody lines written out in standard music notation and on top of every note it has a chord diagram. So what do I play? The chords or the notes? As it's a book of solos, I was expecting it all to be combined.
    I'm used to reading tab, but I've never seen it written out this way before.
    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist." Louis Nizer

  2. #2

    Default

    It's weird the way it is written in those books. If you follow the diagrams and emphasize the melody notes - which you ascertain by ear or by the standard notation - you will find that they are chord solos. I'm not that enamored of them. The arrangements in Craig Brandau's book are much better. Also there are some chords he notates that are just crazy - there are good alternatives to some of the absurd stretches. When I first got the books I really liked them because I had no good alternatives, but for the most part I don't like the arrangements that much and really dislike the method of notation.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Burbank, CA
    Posts
    989

    Default

    It's true that these arrangements are different from some others. But once I understood how the individual (melody) notes almost always come within the shape of the chord you are making, the song emerges nicely. Actually, some of Craig Brandau's work also gets some pretty extreme stretches, so I don't find that unusual in books of this kind. I think that Lyle's work also has a very different flavor of arrangement, coming as it does partly from his earlier work as jazz bassist and his knowledge of more traditional American jazz studio work. Hint: listen to the accompanying CD that comes with the book and much will become clear. Follow Lyle's dictum: "noodling", that is, play around with fingerings and notes. You don't have to play exactly as the written version shows!
    Craig


    Beau Hannam Spiral Rosette tenor
    Moore Bettah tenor "Ki Uke"
    Kinnard mahogany tenor
    Koa Works tenor
    Koa Works concert
    Pohaku custom mahogany concert

  4. #4
    Hippie Dribble Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CTurner View Post
    It's true that these arrangements are different from some others. But once I understood how the individual (melody) notes almost always come within the shape of the chord you are making, the song emerges nicely. Actually, some of Craig Brandau's work also gets some pretty extreme stretches, so I don't find that unusual in books of this kind. I think that Lyle's work also has a very different flavor of arrangement, coming as it does partly from his earlier work as jazz bassist and his knowledge of more traditional American jazz studio work. Hint: listen to the accompanying CD that comes with the book and much will become clear. Follow Lyle's dictum: "noodling", that is, play around with fingerings and notes. You don't have to play exactly as the written version shows!
    Well said Craig. Couldn't agree more. the few times I've looked at a tab arrangement I adapted it and butcher it up to suit my own playing and put my own sorta slant on it. Also part of the learning process and gets you into putting together your own arrangements. i used them as a chalkboard or notebook as opposed to a blueprint.

    Also, just a by-the-way, anyone who likes what they see/hear in Lyle's books should check out his incredible album from 1958 called 'How About Uke'. The defining ukulele jazz album.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Blackburn, UK
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Thanks guys. I think I pretty much get how it works now. I'll have a look at Craig Brandau's work as well.
    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist." Louis Nizer

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    One thing to note, generally, is that when playing or arranging chord melodies, the melody note should be the highest tone in the chord. That may require the arranger to come up with some funky inversions to fit the arrangement. You should take a look at James Hills website The Ukulele Way. He touches upon this in the later lessons. I, personally, found Lyle Ritzs books to be a great challenge and I learned a lot from them. I've recently pulled his books out after a couple years away from them. Except this time, I'm playing them on my baritone. Craig Brandaus book is great too.

  7. #7

    Default

    So I am thinking of getting one of the 3 Lyle Ritz books. Which of the three would be the most user-friendly re: content, cd, arrangements etc?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    356

    Default

    They all require a very good knowledge of chord structure, flexibility, concentration and a willingness to put hours of effort into learning. If you do this you will be rewarded with great tunes and the ability to play other tunes.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •