Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44

Thread: Cute Little Guitar

  1. #1

    Default Cute Little Guitar

    Person 1: Hey! That's a cute little guitar
    Me: Thanks, It's called ooo koo lay lay

    Person 2: That's a cute little guitar
    Me: Thanks, It's called ooo koo lay lay

    Person 3: That's a cute little guitar
    Me: Thanks, It's called ooo koo lay lay

    Person 4: That's a cute little guitar
    Me: Thanks, Yeah it's like a cute little guitar

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    West Midlands GB
    Posts
    1,934

    Default

    They're not wrong. That is, in essence, what it is - a little guitar, and cute.

    What is interesting, to me, is the way guitarists respond to the ukulele. A few years ago, I was playing and singing in a pub, and two fellas showed an interest in my soprano uke. Both were guitar players. I explained that the uke was tuned gCEA (with the 'g' string in the octave above the other three) and thus it was like a guitar capo'd at the fifth fret.

    I handed the uke to them and one immediately started strumming some basic chord sequences. He was really delighted, saying he would get himself one ASAP. He handed it to the other bloke, who was an equally competent guitarist, but the second fella found the uke utterly confusing. He couldn't do anything with it.

    I guess it depends upon their mental approach to playing the guitar. If you are happy just to play basis "shapes" with your left hand, then the uke will make perfect sense. If you think about chords as collections of notes, and need to know what notes you are playing, and in what key, then it is much more difficult.

    I'm a shapes man, myself.

    John Colter

  3. #3

    Default

    Guitars are just big ukuleles

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    425

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukantor View Post
    They're not wrong. That is, in essence, what it is - a little guitar, and cute.

    What is interesting, to me, is the way guitarists respond to the ukulele. A few years ago, I was playing and singing in a pub, and two fellas showed an interest in my soprano uke. Both were guitar players. I explained that the uke was tuned gCEA (with the 'g' string in the octave above the other three) and thus it was like a guitar capo'd at the fifth fret.

    I handed the uke to them and one immediately started strumming some basic chord sequences. He was really delighted, saying he would get himself one ASAP. He handed it to the other bloke, who was an equally competent guitarist, but the second fella found the uke utterly confusing. He couldn't do anything with it.

    I guess it depends upon their mental approach to playing the guitar. If you are happy just to play basis "shapes" with your left hand, then the uke will make perfect sense. If you think about chords as collections of notes, and need to know what notes you are playing, and in what key, then it is much more difficult.

    I'm a shapes man, myself.

    John Colter
    Makes sense to me. I am into shapes, patterns and the starting position (which usually tells me what key I'm in).
    -Joe......Have uke, will travel...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Well stated

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Springfield, IL
    Posts
    1,230

    Default

    Shapes rule !!!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    116

    Default

    I googled and found the uke really is a four stringed guitar. Wouldn't have realized...
    Have a good soprano

    My whistling channel

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Hope, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    799

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukantor View Post
    They're not wrong. That is, in essence, what it is - a little guitar, and cute.

    What is interesting, to me, is the way guitarists respond to the ukulele. A few years ago, I was playing and singing in a pub, and two fellas showed an interest in my soprano uke. Both were guitar players. I explained that the uke was tuned gCEA (with the 'g' string in the octave above the other three) and thus it was like a guitar capo'd at the fifth fret.

    I handed the uke to them and one immediately started strumming some basic chord sequences. He was really delighted, saying he would get himself one ASAP. He handed it to the other bloke, who was an equally competent guitarist, but the second fella found the uke utterly confusing. He couldn't do anything with it.

    I guess it depends upon their mental approach to playing the guitar. If you are happy just to play basis "shapes" with your left hand, then the uke will make perfect sense. If you think about chords as collections of notes, and need to know what notes you are playing, and in what key, then it is much more difficult.

    I'm a shapes man, myself.

    John Colter
    About a decade ago, I was a guitarist who also played banjo, mandolin and mouth harp and dabbled with other instruments but had always thought of ukuleles as toys.
    I was at a party and a fellow named David Newland was there with a metal bodied reso-uke. I liked the look and sound of it and David asked me if I'd like to try it. David ended up playing guitar for the rest of the night because I was having so much fun with the uke. Shortly after that, I bought my first ukulele, a Kala concert koa. Soon after I played the uke in the Maple Leaf Champions Jug Band and I was hooked.
    David had started a group called The Corktown Uke Club in Toronto and when he moved to Cobourg, the club members gave him a National uke as a gift. He asked me if I'd ike to buy his old reso-uke (a Johnson) and I now own the very ukulele that got me into this "4 strings made of nylon" way of thinking.
    Here are my first uke and the reso I got from David.
    ukestraps.jpg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Honolulu
    Posts
    551

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukantor View Post
    They're not wrong. That is, in essence, what it is - a little guitar, and cute.

    What is interesting, to me, is the way guitarists respond to the ukulele. A few years ago, I was playing and singing in a pub, and two fellas showed an interest in my soprano uke. Both were guitar players. I explained that the uke was tuned gCEA (with the 'g' string in the octave above the other three) and thus it was like a guitar capo'd at the fifth fret.

    I handed the uke to them and one immediately started strumming some basic chord sequences. He was really delighted, saying he would get himself one ASAP. He handed it to the other bloke, who was an equally competent guitarist, but the second fella found the uke utterly confusing. He couldn't do anything with it.

    I guess it depends upon their mental approach to playing the guitar. If you are happy just to play basis "shapes" with your left hand, then the uke will make perfect sense. If you think about chords as collections of notes, and need to know what notes you are playing, and in what key, then it is much more difficult.

    I'm a shapes man, myself.

    John Colter
    I don't think it's a notes vs shape/pattern thing for guitarists. Most of us can noddle on the darn thing like crazy before the left hand cramps up. It's the tiny scale and fingerboard of the 'ukulele that befuddles most guitarists. Took me a couple months to get used to the 20" baritone scale so I didn't cramp or have to look at my hand. A few more months for the 17" tenor scale, albeit that was an easier transition than 25.5" to 20". Now I can freely jump from any size from tenor ukulele to bass guitar without missing a lick.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Germany, near Frankfurt/M.
    Posts
    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukantor View Post
    They're not wrong. That is, in essence, what it is - a little guitar, and cute.

    John Colter
    That‘s how most people see it today, for sure. And that‘s also how I would explain a ukulele to someone who doesn‘t know anything about ukuleles.
    However,, historically, it‘s not correct. As the modern acoustic or Spanish guitar we know today was invented in early 19th century. That was also because the technology to produce wound gut-strings - necessary for the deeper strings of a Spanish guitar - wasn’t invented earlier.
    But smaller, four- or five-stringed instruments, even with reentrant tunings, were around long before that. Of course, they weren’t called ukuleles. There are tablatures for the so-called Renaissance guitar which can be played without any modifications on a modern ukulele. Check out wwelti‘s YouTube channel. He is one of the few persons I know who mostly play classical/Baroque and Renaissance music on a ukulele.

    So from the point of view of an historian of instrument making, a guitar is indeed more like a enlarged ukulele. With too many strings, I would add personally.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •