Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: I my uke's bend upward?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    10

    Default I my uke's bend upward?

    IMG_0891.jpgIMG_0892.jpg

    Hi,
    I wonder if my uke is bent upward.
    If it is, how can I fix this?
    And when flatten my uke, can I grind saddle so I can have lower action?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,505

    Default

    Hi Ukutravel

    A bit of bend in the neck is normal. It is called relief. It's hard to tell from the photos, but yours looks pretty normal to me.

    Action height is another matter. I can't tell how high your action is from the photos, but it's worth measuring the action by holding a ruler against the strings at the 12th fret. The site I linked to below recommends between 2.5mm and 3mm between the fret and the string (that's the bottom of the string not the top). If your action is too high, loosen the strings and remove the bridge. Then sand the BOTTOM of the bridge, not the top. I would also recommend against using power tools because it will grind too much too quickly.

    I have done this on a couple of my ukes and the action is now about 2.25mm on both.

    https://www.ukulelemate.com.au/pages...uality-control
    Last edited by robinboyd; 11-21-2019 at 03:57 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Mission Viejo, CA
    Posts
    1,772

    Default

    Canít tell from pictures. I can think of only 2 things that could happen, but generally rare. The neck is pulling away from the uke body. Iíve seen this on some vintage instruments and usually there is a gap at the heel.

    Or the neck has bent to where there is excessive relief. Also kinda rare, but I had it happen on one uke. Easy to test. Put a capo on the first fret, or have someone press the string, and press the string down on the last fret. There should be a slight gap around the 7th fret. I think it is around .004Ē/.1mm on a uke. If it is close to .5mm there is a problem. You canít really fix it unless the uke is worth the $$$.

    John

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Thank you for the reply.
    The distance between string and fretboard is like:
    1st fret: 1.2mm
    3rd fret: 2.0mm
    5th fret: 2.2mm
    7th fret: 3.0mm
    9th fret: 3.2mm
    11th fret: 3.5mm
    12th fret: 3.2mm

    So guess it is okey

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,505

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukutravel View Post
    Thank you for the reply.
    The distance between string and fretboard is like:
    1st fret: 1.2mm
    3rd fret: 2.0mm
    5th fret: 2.2mm
    7th fret: 3.0mm
    9th fret: 3.2mm
    11th fret: 3.5mm
    12th fret: 3.2mm

    So guess it is okey
    3.2mm at the 12th fret is a tiny bit on the high side. It really depends on whether you feel that it affects your playing, though. If you feel that it is hampering you, it can't hurt to sand the bottom of the bridge a bit next time you change strings. Not sure what is going on with the 11th fret. Perhaps you have some uneven frets.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Probably I'll sand the bottom of the bridge.
    But if sand it, isn't string and fretboard distance in 1st fret gets too close?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    West Midlands GB
    Posts
    2,148

    Default

    Ukulele necks are intended to be flat. Take a steel rule and place it along the fret board on top of the frets. Ideally it should touch the top of each fret. If you find any bowing or curve, this can be acceptable, provided it is in the concave direction, and is very, very slight. If it adversely affects the way the ukulele plays, then it is not acceptable.

    If there is any curve in the opposite(convex) direction, then you have something to worry about. It will be very obvious that the ukulele is not playing as it should.

    It is not feasible to correct a bent neck. You either live with it, if you can, or get another uke.

    John Colter.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
    Can’t tell from pictures. I can think of only 2 things that could happen, but generally rare. The neck is pulling away from the uke body. I’ve seen this on some vintage instruments and usually there is a gap at the heel.

    Or the neck has bent to where there is excessive relief. Also kinda rare, but I had it happen on one uke. Easy to test. Put a capo on the first fret, or have someone press the string, and press the string down on the last fret. There should be a slight gap around the 7th fret. I think it is around .004”/.1mm on a uke. If it is close to .5mm there is a problem. You can’t really fix it unless the uke is worth the $$$.

    John
    Tried testing with capo, and seems like they fit okey. Thank you for the advice

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukantor View Post
    Ukulele necks are intended to be flat. Take a steel rule and place it along the fret board on top of the frets. Ideally it should touch the top of each fret. If you find any bowing or curve, this can be acceptable, provided it is in the concave direction, and is very, very slight. If it adversely affects the way the ukulele plays, then it is not acceptable.

    If there is any curve in the opposite(convex) direction, then you have something to worry about. It will be very obvious that the ukulele is not playing as it should.

    It is not feasible to correct a bent neck. You either live with it, if you can, or get another uke.

    John Colter.

    Fretboard itself is flat, but neck and body is jointed in very slight curved manner.
    I'll first try to change string with lighter tension and live with it.
    Thanks for the help

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,505

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukutravel View Post
    Probably I'll sand the bottom of the bridge.
    But if sand it, isn't string and fretboard distance in 1st fret gets too close?
    No. The distance at the first fret is mostly dictated by the height of the nut.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •