Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: FS: Southern Cross Gibson Copy Concert Banjo Uke

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    100

    Default FS: Southern Cross Gibson Copy Concert Banjo Uke

    Southern Cross 1.jpgSouthern Cross 2.jpgSouthern Cross 4.jpgSouthern Cross 5.jpg

    I got this from another forum member and put some work into it, including: getting the frets professionally dressed; replacing the head with a new Remo Renaissance; replacing the bridge with a newer Gold Tone bridge; and adding a brass armrest. It sounds good and projects very well. It has a few minor signs of use. The action is low enough that at the 14th fret, if you're pressing the string down, it doesn't clear the head -- as shown in the photo. But most people never get that high not he neck.

    I'm asking $325 with free shipping in the CONUS.
    Beansprout Concert Banjo Uke
    Beltona concert resonator
    Tyde concert learner uke
    Stuart Wailing nickel/brass concert
    Gold Tone Little Gem concert banjolele
    Gold Tone BUC concert banjolele
    Kmise Baritone

  2. #2

    Default

    Is the neck straight (I would assume that it is)? If so, is your replacement bridge lower than the original? If it is the same height, does the uke have a coordinator rod? If it does, you could adjust the neck angle with the coordinator rod.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    100

    Default

    The neck is straight. I've got both bridges, the original and the Gold Tone. Both are about the same height. I just like that the Gold Tone has three supports. The shell does have a rod in it. I hope that helps.
    Beansprout Concert Banjo Uke
    Beltona concert resonator
    Tyde concert learner uke
    Stuart Wailing nickel/brass concert
    Gold Tone Little Gem concert banjolele
    Gold Tone BUC concert banjolele
    Kmise Baritone

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milwaukee Matzen View Post
    Is the neck straight (I would assume that it is)? If so, is your replacement bridge lower than the original? If it is the same height, does the uke have a coordinator rod? If it does, you could adjust the neck angle with the coordinator rod.
    No you can't. it's a fallacy. Unless you are prepared to shim the neck to body joint that is.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dponeil@xtra.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Darlington UK
    Posts
    822

    Default

    Oh that looks neat!
    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing

    Tanglewood TU13M concert called Kalea
    Brunswick BU4-B baritone called Kalua
    Fender DG5 Dreadnought guitar named Tilly
    Tanglewood Discovery guitar
    Valencia hybrid classical guitar

    My Music Blog

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
    Posts
    4,700

    Default

    That's tempting. It would be neat if you could do a playing sample of all the ones you're selling compared to the Beansprout.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Flea soprano, C LW
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Bonanzalele concert
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127
    Pelem, A, EJ45LP

    !Flukutronic!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hanks View Post
    That's tempting. It would be neat if you could do a playing sample of all the ones you're selling compared to the Beansprout.
    If anyone is seriously interested in the Southern Cross, I can try to record a sound sample. In the meantime, here's the Beansprout, which is not for sale. https://youtu.be/efv6bl76CNY
    Beansprout Concert Banjo Uke
    Beltona concert resonator
    Tyde concert learner uke
    Stuart Wailing nickel/brass concert
    Gold Tone Little Gem concert banjolele
    Gold Tone BUC concert banjolele
    Kmise Baritone

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    No you can't. it's a fallacy. Unless you are prepared to shim the neck to body joint that is.
    Not to get too far off topic here...

    Since you built this uke, I will not attempt to argue with you. That being said, on most banjos you can adjust the neck angle slightly via the coordinator rod. I would assume that it would be the same with a banjo uke (It definitely is on the vintage Gibson banjo mandolins that I have owned).

    When it comes to banjos (in general), it is not a fallacy. Even the two Ome banjos that I own, that have what look like dowel sticks, have spacers on one end that can be added or removed in order to make slight neck adjustments.

    The Romero that I used to have used a system that was similar to early Gibson banjos. Here's a description from their website:

    COORDINATOR ROD
    We're proud to be using a coordinator rod & neck attachment system designed in our workshop here at Romero Banjos. We created this original design here in the banjo workshop early on, and believe it is the best way to attach a banjo neck. OME Banjos and Vance Banjos both liked it so much that they have also adapted our design on their instruments.

    Romero banjo necks are attached using a two lagbolt technique adapted from early Gibson banjos, in use since the 1920s. However, rather than having two metal coordinator rods - one attached to each lagbolt - we continue to use two lagbolts to attach the neck and rim but have developed a unique single coordinator rod using machined brass and wood. Combining the functionality and strength of a metal coordinator rod with the beauty of the wooden dowel stick common to turn-of-the-century open back banjos, our proprietary attachment system results in excellent tone, long-term stability, and ease and adaptability for future adjustments."

    Here's a video on adjusting a coordinator rod from another major banjo manufacturer:


    Here's Frank Ford's take on coordinator rods:
    http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Musi...coordrod1.html

    Excerpt from the book "How to Set Up the Best Sounding Banjo" by Roger Siminoff:
    rods.jpg

    Here's Jake Wildwood's blog page in which he writes about making a coordinator rod adjustment on a 1920's Gibson UB3 banjo ukulele:
    https://jakewildwood.blogspot.com/20...o-ukulele.html

    The strings should not be hitting the head of the uke. My intent was to give the seller (or buyer) some ideas on how to remedy this issue.

    Since the banjo ukulele is of your creation, maybe you could offer some insight on how best to remedy this?

    All the best,

    Ryan


    edit: I added three more references having to do with coordinator rods.
    Last edited by Milwaukee Matzen; 11-24-2019 at 11:13 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milwaukee Matzen View Post
    Not to get too far off topic here...

    Since you built this uke, I will not attempt to argue with you. That being said, on most banjos you can adjust the neck angle slightly via the coordinator rod. I would assume that it would be the same with a banjo uke (It definitely is on the vintage Gibson banjo mandolins that I have owned).

    When it comes to banjos (in general), it is not a fallacy. Even the two Ome banjos that I own, that have what look like dowel sticks, have spacers on one end that can be added or removed in order to make slight neck adjustments.

    The Romero that I used to have used a system that was similar to early Gibson banjos. Here's a description from their website:

    "COORDINATOR ROD
    We're proud to be using a coordinator rod & neck attachment system designed in our workshop here at Romero Banjos. We created this original design here in the banjo workshop early on, and believe it is the best way to attach a banjo neck. OME Banjos and Vance Banjos both liked it so much that they have also adapted our design on their instruments.

    Romero banjo necks are attached using a two lagbolt technique adapted from early Gibson banjos, in use since the 1920s. However, rather than having two metal coordinator rods - one attached to each lagbolt - we continue to use two lagbolts to attach the neck and rim but have developed a unique single coordinator rod using machined brass and wood. Combining the functionality and strength of a metal coordinator rod with the beauty of the wooden dowel stick common to turn-of-the-century open back banjos, our proprietary attachment system results in excellent tone, long-term stability, and ease and adaptability for future adjustments."


    Here's a video on adjusting a coordinator rod from another major banjo manufacturer:


    The strings should not be hitting the head of the uke. My intent was to give the seller (or buyer) some ideas on how to remedy this issue.

    Since the banjo ukulele is of your creation, maybe you could offer some insight on how best to remedy this?

    All the best,

    Ryan
    As I stated you can not alter the action on a banjo uke by playing with the rim rod, unless, you are prepared to shim the neck and do it well. The item in question may need a taller bridge, which is why companies make bridges of varying heights. When I made this instrument quite a few years ago the strings did not hit the head. However, it has presumably been through a few owners since then. The original calfskin head has been changed so the instrument has been disassembled, maybe more than once. At the time of the build, the break angle of the neck to the body would have been very close to 2.5 degrees or 87.5 degrees if you prefer. The bridge was probably a Grover half-inch or could have been a 5/8th inch I can't remember that far back. Once the break angle is established it is not possible to change it by altering the tension on the rim rod, unless you are prepared to shim the neck. The correct way is to alter the height of the bridge. Just like shimming or sanding the bottom of a uke saddle if the action was off at the bridge end. You would not consider trying to alter the angle of a ukulele neck to change the action. I do not make Banjos or Mandolins so will not address those instruments.
    PS The original reason for rim rods on banjo ukes was to stop the ply bodies from deforming under string tension, which in my humble opinion was never needed. But, people expect to see them and so silly builders like me follow convention. I could easily build banjo ukes without any rim rods, just two hanger bolts which incidentally would still not offer a method of action adjustment.
    Last edited by DPO; 11-24-2019 at 09:54 AM.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dponeil@xtra.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  10. #10

    Default

    In my experience (on a banjo), the adjustments are usually small enough were a shim would not be needed. I guess that we'll have to agree to disagree on that one.

    I've encountered a few banjos were previous owners (while thinking that they were just "tightening things up"), unknowingly made a coordinator rod adjustment and pushed or pulled the neck out of alignment. I was thinking that this may be the case with this uke.

    The seller previously stated that the replacement bridge was the same height as the original bridge. Otherwise, like you are saying, I would have suggested a taller bridge. The only other thing that I can think of (besides the coordinator rod being messed with) is that the Ren head may have a different crown height than the original and/or it is not tightened as it should.

    All the best,

    Ryan

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •