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Thread: Disaster

  1. #31
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    What I think is meant by the dynamic is where the joint is subject to flexing.
    Jerry Rosa uses it on cracks in guitars. Saw it on one of his youtube repair videos under RSW (Rosa String Works?).

  2. #32
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    Hmmm..........when I mend a crack I don't want to encourage it, or enable it, to flex. I'm looking for a strong, tight, durable bond. If flexibility of the repaired piece is thought to be an important factor, would you avoid the use of cleats and rely on the CA alone to make the repair?

    John C.

  3. #33
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    If the glue is brittle, or can only work in tension (classic CA problem), any flexing will cause it to shear. If you have the cleats, they will only work locally, but not where the cleat isn't holding. If you go belt and suspenders, ie the rubberized CA *AND* the cleats, you get some overlap. That's my thinking. Some day I'll test my theory!

  4. #34
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    Yup, that sounds very feasible. Regular CA has worked well for me so far, but I'll certainly give the rubberized type consideration for future repairs.

    Thanks for the insight,

    John Colter

  5. #35
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    I find this whole idea of a "dynamic" (why don't they just say "flexible"? Marketing my friend, marketing), CA glue fascinating. However I can't really think of where I would want a glued joint on an ukulele to be flexible except perhaps on a crack. A crack caused by contraction due to humidity issues. Seems that would be a great solution to expansion/contraction issues. However, as we remember, this crack was not due to an expansion/contraction issue but due to a violent event perpetrated by its builder. I will not mention names here, but this uke was severely traumatized. Sure, it was said that it "flew off the bench". Likely story.

  6. #36
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    This uke has now been in my care for a number of weeks. I have observed no tendency for it to leap about or suddenly fly off. It seems to observe the laws of physics much as any other musical instrument does. In fact, it seems to be particularly placid and patient, as it hangs about waiting for the refinishing process to work towards to a conclusion.

    I think it best to draw a discreet veil over the mysterious incident that brought it my way.

    John Colter

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by ukantor View Post
    Hi Ukeanixi, I used Bostic Super Glue, marked "Multi-Purpose Liquid". It is just a regular household brand. The important thing is that it is a thin liquid type. This helps it to penetrate the crack very quickly. Some other types of CA are much thicker and don't work so well on closed cracks.

    You have to use it sparingly, and very carefully, or it will go everywhere and make a mess.

    John Colter
    I suspect that I don’t understand something about the repair quite well enough in that a very quick acting (literally in seconds) type of glue has been used. The advantages of self wicking are clear enough though.

    Everyone has their own favourites that have given good results for them. For what woodworking I do myself I’ve been very pleased with standard Evostick products, my recollection is of a clear setting white runny liquid which could be worked into a crack (so not strictly self wicking but a determined person would readily find a way with non fine cracks). Full strength in a day but setting time is, IIRC, under half an hour (so, if needed, there’s time to correct some errors and excess glue is easily wiped away).

    The glues mentioned by Ukeanixi are two part adhesives so unless I misunderstand (again) how the second part enters the crack is a mystery to me. “2P-10 is a two-part ten-second adhesive. Just apply the adhesive, then spray the activator and stick it together for a strong, permanent bond.” The rubberised product is for items subject to shock loading, so not really Ukes IMHO - well that’s the impression that I get from the manufacturer’s website and video.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 01-07-2020 at 05:06 AM.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    The glues mentioned by Ukeanixi are two part adhesives so unless I misunderstand (again) how the second part enters the crack is a mystery to me. “2P-10 is a two-part ten-second adhesive. Just apply the adhesive, then spray the activator and stick it together for a strong, permanent bond.”
    The second part is an "accelerator" which is water-like thin and is not an adhesive. It flows into the crack and around the CA glue causing it to instantly harden. I always use an accelerator when I use standard CA glue. The chemical reaction by the way gives off cyanide gas. Fun with glues?

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    The second part is an "accelerator" which is water-like thin and is not an adhesive. It flows into the crack and around the CA glue causing it to instantly harden. I always use an accelerator when I use standard CA glue. The chemical reaction by the way gives off cyanide gas. Fun with glues?
    Graham has a good point: the manufacturer of the stuff claims it to be 2-part

    If it were actually 2-part there would be a mixing of the parts before application. I surely believe that the spray stuff is an acceleration chemical of some sort, as Sequoia suggests.

    It may not be very important to the discussion after all. The rubberized stuff is a gel! You won't be able to easily get it to wick into a crack anyway. I suppose that you could use a bit of solvent to thin it out. I've got this solvent called "Super Solvent" by Golden West, available on amazon or ebay, which claims to clean off CA glue. If I ever get the rubberized version I'll experiment with thinning it out for cracks.
    Last edited by ukeanixi; 01-09-2020 at 09:31 AM. Reason: fix typo

  10. #40
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    Default Disaster!

    The subject of this thread is now back in good health. The strings were fitted yesterday (Aquila Super Nylgut) and are settling nicely. It sounds just as a Ken Timms style 0 should sound.

    The repair is virtually invisible. I reckon anyone who didn't know about the damaged side would not see anything amiss. The refinishing with shellac worked out satisfactorily, but Janet Timms would probably not be very impressed by my efforts!

    I am enjoying playing this little survivor. It has a particularly appealing voice and is working its way into my affections. They do that, don't they?

    John Colter
    19 - Ken Timms, split side, repaired & finished.jpg18 - Ken Timms, split side, repaired and finished.jpg

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