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Thread: What is the purpose for super accurate tuners?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by YUNI View Post
    Happy Thanksgiving 2.0!! (We had ours in Canada earlier haha)

    So I have a snark tuner that I usually just use to check that the strings are in tune before playing, and then again if something sounds off. But I've seen more accurate/sensitive ones and I was wondering how people usually use these? I'm.not sure my own ears would notice if something was like a cent or two off (and whether I would bother to fix it every time lol) but maybe I just need to do more ear training
    I'm not as concerned with accuracy as with speed and ease of use. I have some cheap tuners that can't settle on a note, so they're a waste of time. Snark, and other quality tuners, swing to the center quickly as I turn the tuners. Is my tuning 100% accurate or only 99.6%? As far as I'm concerned, it doesn't matter.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  2. #22
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    As demonstrated by this thread, like everything else tuning is different for everyone. Some just want to get their ukes tuned up and play. Others turn it into a ritual. I've gone down that road and back myself. Watching some of the people in my strum groups, I think they use it as a Zen thing to get their head into it before we start playing. But I think I've finally settled somewhere in the middle. I mean, you're not there to tune, eventually you're going to have to play.
    Last edited by Rllink; 11-29-2019 at 05:37 AM.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  3. #23
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    After reading the recent (quite heated) thread on intonation, I'd be afraid of what the strobe tuner would tell me about my instrument. From what I gathered from that discussion, intonation is as much art as science and there are compromises to be made when building an instrument which, I'm thinking would be all the more apparent with a strobe tuner!

    Now, someone obsessive, might use that information and tune each string at a different fret to achieve the ultimate compromise.
    Glenn

  4. #24
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    "Now, someone obsessive, might use that information and tune each string at a different fret to achieve the ultimate compromise."

    But would they be able to discern the difference by ear - and if not, what is the point?

    John Colter

  5. #25
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    The more accurate the better.

  6. #26
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    Problem is you have to use more time and effort than necessary on the tuning if "overdoing" it. I'm quite demanding, but seriously you get it right enough I'd guess with any electronic tuner. If you like the outfit, you are ok.

    Of course I still tune every day I play, even if the same strings have been there since purchase a couple of years ago. Telling just so it doesn't look I'm taking this lightly...
    Have a good soprano

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  7. #27
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    The problem with strobe tuners is this: We always want tune from down to up. Of course this is more a trouble with wound strings like in guitar, or low G uke and the nut lubrication. When we finally get the display not moving left or right, we might have turned winders somewhat down. So they are frustrating to use, especially my UniTune display.

    The standard needle display is about 2 cents accurate only, which is enough.

    Some folks here have bought a tuning fork, which we all should have as a hobby or interest
    Someone sayed here having bought tuning forks supposed to be A 440 Hz and then not. Good tuning forks are just right in that frequency they are specified to be, in room temperature, something like 22 Celcius.
    Tuning fork works better on guitar in my opinion. Best way I could do on guitar is to compare 5th and 7th fret string harmonics of the bass E and A strings to first E string open after relative tuning, and then the octaves, to avoid cumulative error.

    Just it never will be as accurate as using an electronic tuner. But yes get a tuning fork, I recommend that to everybody. The experience gives much more appreciation to our electronic tuners.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 11-29-2019 at 10:31 AM.

  8. #28
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    This is the best clip-on tuner that I have used:

    TC Electronic UniTune Clip-on Tuner

    It's twice the price of a Snark, but way more accurate.

    I can tune to the green lights quickly and accurately, or I can fine tune as needed. The red lights kind of fade into the green as the pitch gets closer, so it's easy to see how close each note is to being on the money. That way I can "temper" a string to compromise the tuning a bit on ukuleles that have less than perfect intonation (which is most of 'em, haha).

    I've hated Snark tuners ever since they switched from the little dots to the bars on their display.
    If music be the food of love, play on! -Bill Shakespeare

  9. #29
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    In my case, I am the weak link in the tuning process and not the tuner. I have a Snark which I've had for about 4 years and basically if my string is one or two clicks to either side of center, that's good enough for me. So a Peterson tuner would just be a lot of wasted money for me. I might still get a Peterson eventually just because this is my hobby and I want to accessorize. However it would be illogical. And I think in my heart of hearts I do believe that the whole uber-accuracy is just marketing. I consider it to be on the same level as people buying super high definition television sets that have egregiously astronomical frame rates when anything over 14 FPS is not observable by the naked eye. It is like a person's self-worth is equated to his or her television's resolution and frame rate.

  10. #30
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    Yes that sort of is ripock.

    Regarding tuning forks when you people want go old style. You should not buy ones with round rods. They are mostly just cheap crap. A good tuning fork needs have a rectangular cross section if it is supposed be any good.

    Steedy, I use also the color display with some red, in compromises on C and E strings. My ukuleles are not perfect, or their strings.

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