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Thread: The advantage of baritone ukulele

  1. #1
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    Default The advantage of baritone ukulele

    So I was reading a blues turnaround TAB from a guitar mag and I could not fret the B7 chord cleanly, my pinkie kept buzzing because its soft and the strings on my guitar feel like cheese wires.
    So I tried the same on my baritone uke, nailed it!

    The thing is I could use the same chord shapes on my concert ukes. I'd be playing different chords but the sound would be similar.
    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing

    Tanglewood TU13M concert called Kalea
    Brunswick BU4-B baritone called Kalua
    Fender DG5 Dreadnought guitar named Tilly
    Tanglewood Discovery guitar
    Valencia hybrid classical guitar

    My Music Blog

  2. #2
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    Dec 2007
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    Default

    You got it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    San Francisco Bay Area
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    Default

    +1. If you're a guitar player, baritone uke is a natural.
    Kala KA-TE tenor uke (currently tuned F-Bb-D-G w/Worth Browns)
    Kala APB-CTG baritone uke (currently tuned D-G-B-E w Worth Browns)
    Ohana BK-35CG baritone uke (tuned A-D-F#-B w/Savarez classical guitar strings)
    Various guitars, banjos, and basses

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LarryS View Post
    So I was reading a blues turnaround TAB from a guitar mag and I could not fret the B7 chord cleanly, my pinkie kept buzzing because its soft and the strings on my guitar feel like cheese wires.
    So I tried the same on my baritone uke, nailed it!

    The thing is I could use the same chord shapes on my concert ukes. I'd be playing different chords but the sound would be similar.
    Or you could re-string your guitar with nylon strings
    There are those who will wax lyrical about the ability to play a double shuffle with a split fan and a tight G-string ...
    it just makes me walk funny!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryS View Post
    So I was reading a blues turnaround TAB from a guitar mag and I could not fret the B7 chord cleanly, my pinkie kept buzzing because its soft and the strings on my guitar feel like cheese wires.
    So I tried the same on my baritone uke, nailed it!

    The thing is I could use the same chord shapes on my concert ukes. I'd be playing different chords but the sound would be similar.
    Or you could re-string your guitar with nylon strings
    There are those who will wax lyrical about the ability to play a double shuffle with a split fan and a tight G-string ...
    it just makes me walk funny!

  6. #6
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    Mar 2016
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    Darlington UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by kypfer View Post
    Or you could re-string your guitar with nylon strings
    I already have a classical (hybrid) guitar...
    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing

    Tanglewood TU13M concert called Kalea
    Brunswick BU4-B baritone called Kalua
    Fender DG5 Dreadnought guitar named Tilly
    Tanglewood Discovery guitar
    Valencia hybrid classical guitar

    My Music Blog

  7. #7
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    Oct 2011
    Location
    Blaine, Washington
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    What brand and gauge of strings are you using on your guitar? Could always change to a extra light set if steel. Your comment on a cheese cutter reminded me of the early '60's where we used Black Diamond strings on a cheap badlt setup guitar; were called cheese cutters.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    3

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    With worsening arthritis I went to nylon string guitar but my fretting (left) hand is still bad, needs a rest. Out came the baritone uke setup nice and low and strung up with D'addario ej34 folk nylon guitar strings (ball end). The bridge is pretty chewed up for the d string on this old Lindell baritone uke my wife had (probably from the 60's or 70's). I use the four highest strings... And I'm fretting with the right hand (just learning). Not too difficult, coming along fine for some old folk and tin pan alley songs. I've got three weeks to get in gear until I start back up at the nursing homes in January.
    Last edited by Catapaw; 12-02-2019 at 04:33 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    What brand and gauge of strings are you using on your guitar? Could always change to a extra light set if steel. Your comment on a cheese cutter reminded me of the early '60's where we used Black Diamond strings on a cheap badlt setup guitar; were called cheese cutters.
    I got lights on it. But a dreadnought has a long scale so the strings have a higher tension. And because I don't play often my fingers don't get calluses.
    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing

    Tanglewood TU13M concert called Kalea
    Brunswick BU4-B baritone called Kalua
    Fender DG5 Dreadnought guitar named Tilly
    Tanglewood Discovery guitar
    Valencia hybrid classical guitar

    My Music Blog

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