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Thread: Building a go bar deck.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    89

    Default Building a go bar deck.

    I'm building a go bar deck, I bought some solid 1/4" fiberglass driveway markers that were 4' long and cut them in half, I think they will work good, they seem to have about the right amount of flex. I got a good buy on them at Amazon.


    I'll keep you updated on the progres.

    Here are some pics.

    20191206_111459.jpg20191206_111443.jpg
    Last edited by Sawdust; 12-06-2019 at 06:31 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    central CA
    Posts
    673

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    the next ones I make are gonna be spring loaded.
    My Real name is Terry Harris

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by resoman View Post
    the next ones I make are gonna be spring loaded.
    I never thought about that, sounds like a good idea.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Hawaii Island
    Posts
    184

    Default

    I'm a big fan of spring loaded go bars. I used sticks for years, and still do use them here and there to fill in. About a year ago I tried fiberglas rods. Hated them. Found a buyer and moved on to spring loaded bars. I have a tutorial on my site on how I made them. There are no doubt better ways to make them, but these work for me http://www.pegasusguitars.com/making-go-bars.html Enjoy your building!--Bob

  5. #5
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    Jul 2011
    Location
    central CA
    Posts
    673

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    I believe I saw the spring loaded bars in something Chuck Moore put up once. I just don't remember how he did his. I'm going to use some kind of hollow tube with the dowel as the moving part but I want to machine slots in the tubing and run roll pins into the dowel so that the slots hold everything in place limiting travel in both directions. Something like that. I can see it in my mind but it's hard to splain
    My Real name is Terry Harris

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Eastern Pennsylvania / Jupiter Florida
    Posts
    118

    Default

    I made spring-loaded bars and like them a lot. The idea that I saw some place that works very well for me (with a small shop) is to not have a go-bar deck at all, but rather make the spring-laoded bars long enough to reach between the ceiling and your workbench. (CPVC is cheap) With these bars there is no need to have, or store a separate go-bar deck, and you can make any place on your workbench the go-bar station. I also use these bars to hold small pieces of pearl when I am assembling a complex inlay, again right on the bench. You can see this setup at http://jupiteruke.com/blog/page/3/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Kekaha, Kauai
    Posts
    183

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    Here are some pics of how I made mine.
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/p3CXbTfZK9B1A1wh9
    Brad
    Bradford Donaldson
    Kekaha, HI and Cannon Beach OR
    bradfordj48@outlook.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Santa Rosa, Ca. USA
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Scan 1.jpg
    This is from the former Hanna Lima website on how to build your own spring loaded go bars. My concern about using a flex rod is that the flex may put a sideways force on the glued piece which would slide it away from where you want it placed. The spring loaded bar will apply perpendicular force on the glued item.
    The materials shown are 1/4' wood dowels, 1/2" wood dowels, 1" long spring with a diameter of less than 5/16", and a piece of fishing line to hold the 2 rods together after assembly. I found the springs on Amazon.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Kekaha, Kauai
    Posts
    183

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    I had borrowed the idea from Hana Lima some years ago. The PEX tubing I use vs. the wood dowel saves you from having to drill out the dowel. Also if you insert the stopper rod at least one inch from the top, you can use short lengths of dowel to fine tune the overall length of the go bar. That is useful when switching back and forth between using the radius dish with the deck. One big advantage is the space saving, I can stack two decks in the space a conventional deck requires. I also recommend using two springs to double the amount of travel, this saves a lot of time trying to find the exact length of rod needed.
    Brad
    Bradford Donaldson
    Kekaha, HI and Cannon Beach OR
    bradfordj48@outlook.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelali Kev View Post
    Scan 1.jpg
    This is from the former Hanna Lima website on how to build your own spring loaded go bars. My concern about using a flex rod is that the flex may put a sideways force on the glued piece which would slide it away from where you want it placed. The spring loaded bar will apply perpendicular force on the glued item.
    The materials shown are 1/4' wood dowels, 1/2" wood dowels, 1" long spring with a diameter of less than 5/16", and a piece of fishing line to hold the 2 rods together after assembly. I found the springs on Amazon.
    How long did you make the 1/4" dowels, also did you use oak or pine dowels?

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