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Thread: David Hanson Kiku Build

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
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    4,753

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    Y'all are right, I was thinking A4, but A3 would be more usual and thus easier to get. I think the "real" kiku is 6 strings with the bottom two an octave higher, but I think these 5 string variants give you much of the same flavor
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Bonanzalele concert
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127
    Pelem, A, EJ45LP

    !Flukutronic!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    106

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    Good Point, Jim. What I like about the 5 string variant is that a ukulele player already know 90% of the 4 string chords that will work with a five string. Only a few chords require fretting on that 5th string. On my kiku, I often mute the 5th string rather that add it in a chord. The five string allows for a fuller sound without having to learn all the "guitar shaped" chords. Aint music great

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Western North Carolina
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    44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tukanu View Post
    Good Point, Jim. What I like about the 5 string variant is that a ukulele player already know 90% of the 4 string chords that will work with a five string. Only a few chords require fretting on that 5th string. On my kiku, I often mute the 5th string rather that add it in a chord. The five string allows for a fuller sound without having to learn all the "guitar shaped" chords. Aint music great
    That's interesting. I come at this from the guitar world. There most of the chords work quite well in standard tuning without the 6th string. Furthermore, dropping that string will make it easier to form barre chords for playing up the neck. Perhaps 5 strings is the optimum number for a stringed instrument. 5 fingers, after all ;-)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Western North Carolina
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    The koa is in Colorado and acclimating to the climate. The sides will soon be shaped using the mold shown below (click to enlarge):
    BodyMold.jpg

  5. #15
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    Dec 2019
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    Western North Carolina
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    I’ve decided to use adGBE tuning on the instrument. The first four strings represent standard baritone tuning with a re-entrant D. The fifth string is a high-tuned A. For guitar players, this is standard tuning on strings 1-5, except strings 4 & 5 are tuned an octave higher.

    To visualize the chord fingerings with this tuning, consider the following diagrams (click on the diagrams to enlarge). First, let’s look at standard baritone tuning, DGBE, in the first diagram below. (GCEA has the same shapes, but with different labels).
    DGBE.jpg

    This diagram illustrates possible fingerings for the major chords A-G. The color scheme is blue->root, red->3rd, green->5th. Recall that an ordinary chord must have at least one each of root, 3rd, and 5th. Each column is labeled with the chord name, and the strings are numbered right to left. So, for example, the one-finger G chord has the first string fretted at the third fret to produce a root note. Strings 2-4 are open, picking up a 3rd, another (lower pitched) root, and a 5th, respectively.

    For another example, the usual D chord has the familiar V-shape on strings 1-3 (3rd, root, 5th, respectively), and an open root note on string 4.

    Looking over the diagram, you should see familiar chord shapes within the first few frets, as well as many chord fingerings you may not be familiar with further up the neck (down on the diagram).

    When you’re satisfied that you understand that diagram, consider the following, which adds a fifth string tuned to A (ADGBE tuning):
    ADGBE.jpg

    The first four strings are the same as on the previous diagram. The fifth string shows additional notes that can be added to a given fingering on strings 1-4. For example, the one-finger G chord can add another 3rd note by fretting the fifth string at the second fret. Or, the V-shape D chord has another open 5th on the fifth string.

    These diagrams illustrate one of the most important characteristics of a fretboard: There are regular shapes that can be moved up the fretboard (down on the diagrams) to get new chords with the same fingering.

    Finally, for those of you who groove on this sort of thing, minor chords can be visualized with these diagrams. Simply mentally move the red dots up one fret on the diagram (flattening the 3rds). Dominant 7ths are also readily visualized, as those notes are two frets above the root notes on the diagram.

    BTW, these diagrams were produced by a Java program i wrote years ago. Unfortunately, most browsers have abandoned Java for security reasons; however, MS Explorer can still run Java with certain explicit permissions. If any of you would like to experiment with the program, contact me at public@rlgreene.net.
    Last edited by rlgph; 01-06-2020 at 06:21 AM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    West Philly, PA
    Posts
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    Nice. This is a really cool idea. I love how willing David is to work with the customer on new ideas. I loved going through the build process with him. My David Hanson teardrop soprano is arriving this Wednesday!
    Weymann Model 10 Mahogany Soprano (c. 1918)
    David Hanson (Cripple Creek Mandolins) Mahogany Teardrop Soprano

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    106

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    With rlgph's request for re-entrant "a and d", I'm thinking the cheapest way to go might be to use two sets of baritone strings. The extra B would be tuned down to the re-entrant "a", and the extra E would be tuned down to the re-entrant "d". Would that work? Any recommendations for baritone strings?
    adGBE

  8. #18
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    Dec 2019
    Location
    Western North Carolina
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    I was thinking Living Water high G baritone set with their single low G (if it's long enough), but i'm open to other suggestions. I'm pretty sure that i prefer fluorocarbon (or the similar material used in PHD strings) to nylon or similar materials.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
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    I think either idea would work. David's idea of tuning down baritone strings is certainly safe. If you go with Living Water, be sure to engage Ken on his thoughts for the A3 and your scale length. He probably has an idea whether tuning up the G or tuning down the B would work better.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Bonanzalele concert
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127
    Pelem, A, EJ45LP

    !Flukutronic!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    106

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