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Thread: Can you hear the difference videos vs blind tests in person.

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by jer View Post
    Rarely heard sentiments on any instrument forum. I like that post.
    To each his/her own though.
    I cannot take credit for it. If you listen to some of the luminaries, such as Kimo Hussey and Peter Forrest, they talk about embracing the individuality of the uke's voice. And that's what I try to do. Just to give a practical modus operandi of such a philosophy, here's what I do: instead of listening to sound files, I find a solid uke builder. The assumption is that that person is going to put the blood, sweat, and tears into assuring that the uke is made properly. I let that person do what they do, and I don't interfere (aside from some initial cosmetic preferences). I receive the ukulele. Because of a myriad of variables, maybe the uke sounds husky, maybe shrill, maybe chiming, maybe subtle. As long as the uke is excellent, it doesn't matter. In fact, it just adds to the fun because you're going to play whatever it is you play. But when you add in the voice of the uke it adds some interest into the mix. It is like getting Janis Joplin and Kiri Te Kanawa to sing random songs. The mixture of the traditional and the innovation is a joy to hear. Regardless of how novel or standard the voice of the uke is, after a very short while, that sound becomes ingrained in your heart as "the" sound a uke sound make.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    Denmark
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    899

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    Quote Originally Posted by merlin666 View Post
    I didn't see that video but I am not surprised at all. There is likely much more variation from one individual cut of wood to the next than between broad wood species, and the contribution of wood species to tone is totally over-rated compared to other factors like how the uke is actually built, e.g. how thick the wood and braces are, and how they are positioned relative to each other with the whole symmetry of the body and neck. Though I sure would like to think that my Hawaiian built koa ukes are "special".
    I never saw the video mentioned here, but I saw one where they played a lot of Pono ukuleles with the "same" build but different woods. It did show some of the expected differences in sound, though you would need to listen to the woods back to back to catch the difference.
    Ohana SK30M mahogany super-soprano, Cort UKEBWCOP Blackwood concert, Anuenue African Mahogany Tenor, Fluke Koa Tenor, Hora M1176 spruce Tenor

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Ames, Iowa
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    4,014

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    I have a problem with ukuleles, both sound and looks. I like them all. Or most of them. Some really cheap ukuleles sound bad to me, like Watermans, but for the most part I just hear different voices when I listen to sound samples. And I have tried to use sound samples to help me make choices. But they are lost on me. I just do not have a narrow enough preference to proclaim one sounds superior over another. Same with looks. There are just a lot of beautiful ukuleles out there. How can one even pick one over another? I can't. I just buy a beautiful ukulele that sounds nice and make it mine.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    I cannot take credit for it. If you listen to some of the luminaries, such as Kimo Hussey and Peter Forrest, they talk about embracing the individuality of the uke's voice. And that's what I try to do. Just to give a practical modus operandi of such a philosophy, here's what I do: instead of listening to sound files, I find a solid uke builder. The assumption is that that person is going to put the blood, sweat, and tears into assuring that the uke is made properly. I let that person do what they do, and I don't interfere (aside from some initial cosmetic preferences). I receive the ukulele. Because of a myriad of variables, maybe the uke sounds husky, maybe shrill, maybe chiming, maybe subtle. As long as the uke is excellent, it doesn't matter. In fact, it just adds to the fun because you're going to play whatever it is you play. But when you add in the voice of the uke it adds some interest into the mix. It is like getting Janis Joplin and Kiri Te Kanawa to sing random songs. The mixture of the traditional and the innovation is a joy to hear. Regardless of how novel or standard the voice of the uke is, after a very short while, that sound becomes ingrained in your heart as "the" sound a uke sound make.
    Very interesting philosophy.

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