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Thread: Kmise conversion

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    USA
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    3,331

    Default Kmise conversion

    Had a spare set of Ratios here. I was going to use them on another tenor, but the headstock on that one ended being too thick, a mongo 14.5 mm, when max for Ratios is 13.5. So I installed them on my cheap Kmise tenor instead, replacing the stock geared tuners with pearly buttons. I love the look, and much prefer tuners out the back. This is also the only tenor I've had where I prefer Aquilas, they sound great on this one. I bought it on a lark, to see how good (or bad) a $43.00 tenor could be, and thought I'd be gifting it. But no way, this one sounds and plays great, so it's staying right here with me.

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    Last edited by Ukecaster; 01-10-2020 at 05:40 PM.
    John

  2. #2

    Default

    Love it when you play with something and it comes out so much better than you thought it would.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I would like to try this on my Kmise, did it require enlarging the hole and do you have a photo of the back that you could share. Thanks in advance.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    5,326

    Default

    Nice result. Did you fill in the remaining holes on the back of the headstock? I've used wood filler and then colored it with one of those furniture sticks.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    1,160

    Default

    Curious to see back of head stock picture. As noted above did you ream hole for tuners?
    Thanks

  6. #6
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    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
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    Default

    I only needed to ream a very slight amount on the front holes to fit the black Ratio bushings, only 4-5 turns of the reamer, to remove about 1mm of wood there. I probably could have used the existing bushings, but they were chrome, and wouldn't match the black Ratio tuner posts. Haven't filled the holes on the back, not sure if I'll bother. It's a good sounding uke, loud with good bark & chime. Here's the first song I recorded on it: https://youtu.be/1T9ywaNZfU0

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    Last edited by Ukecaster; 01-11-2020 at 07:08 PM.
    John

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    5

    Default

    Thanks John for the photos and update. I like my Kmise tenor a lot also.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    Nice job. Thanks for update. I’d just put some black screws in the holes left. I did that on a guitar once and it was simple and easy. I never noticed screws again. Looks like you got a good Uke. Have fun!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
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    8,416

    Default

    Way to go. I just love modding my ukes....
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Sparta, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,782

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ukecaster View Post
    I only needed to ream a very slight amount on the front holes to fit the black Ratio bushings, only 4-5 turns of the reamer, to remove about 1mm of wood there. I probably could have used the existing bushings, but they were chrome, and wouldn't match the black Ratio tuner posts. Haven't filled the holes on the back, not sure if I'll bother. It's a good sounding uke, loud with good bark & chime. Here's the first song I recorded on it: https://youtu.be/1T9ywaNZfU0

    20200111_133039.jpg
    20200111_133007.jpg
    It sounded great. Nice bluesy playing and singing of that song. Enjoyed it.
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
    You can learn by reading, but you don’t begin to know until you begin to try to do.

    —Lou Churchill, Plane & Pilot Magazine

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