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Thread: Why Classical Guitars look alike

  1. #11
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    Jul 2009
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    Seattle, WA
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    ampeep, so good to see you on the Forum!

    no reply RE: Classical Guitar shapes and appearances, but the Outdoor Ukuleles
    take it a bit further since each one comes from the same mold!

    I'm enjoying my Outdoor Sopranos and will be taking the Outdoor Tenors around
    as well!

    Enjoy the nice weather where you are. It's freezing in Seattle and will be getting
    colder in the next day or so... also snow on the ground and on the roads!

    Happy New Year, Keith!
    Uncle Rod Higuchi
    ( rohiguchi@gmail.com )

    MP3s: http://www.mediafire.com/?50db7nls4o6m6
    Ukulele Boot Camp, FREE Songbook, Holiday, Hawaiian & More: http://ukulelebootcamp.weebly.com
    Crazy G tutorial on YouTube ( uncle rod crazy g )
    pdf file for Crazy G:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/0o6id06c06...20TAB.pdf?dl=0

  2. #12
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    Mar 2017
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    Honolulu, HI
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    Hi Uncle Rod! Now you have a couple of Outdoor ukuleles. Sent you a private message.

    Happy New Year (& keep warm)
    Keith

  3. #13
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    Mar 2016
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    Darlington UK
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    Classical guitar music is much more formal, strict, so a classical guitar, like a grand piano, is made according to strict rules for playing classical music. Same reason that violins, cellos and trombones etc tend to look the same,
    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing

    Tanglewood TU13M concert called Kalea
    Brunswick BU4-B baritone called Kalua
    Fender DG5 Dreadnought guitar named Tilly
    Tanglewood Discovery guitar
    Valencia hybrid classical guitar

    My Music Blog

  4. #14
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    Feb 2019
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    Honolulu
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryS View Post
    Classical guitar music is much more formal, strict, so a classical guitar, like a grand piano, is made according to strict rules for playing classical music. Same reason that violins, cellos and trombones etc tend to look the same,
    Save for me and three other guys, most people play popular and folk music on classical guitars. I think the most famous classical guitar is Willie Nelson's mid-60s Martin, "Trigger." The classical guitars played by jazz virtuosos Al Di Meola and John McLaughlin are heavily modified and designed more like steel-string instruments but with nylon strings.

  5. #15
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    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by gochugogi View Post
    Save for me and three other guys, most people play popular and folk music on classical guitars. I think the most famous classical guitar is Willie Nelson's mid-60s Martin, "Trigger." The classical guitars played by jazz virtuosos Al Di Meola and John McLaughlin are heavily modified and designed more like steel-string instruments but with nylon strings.
    Yes I play all sorts on my CG, Or I did before the bridge began to lift
    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing

    Tanglewood TU13M concert called Kalea
    Brunswick BU4-B baritone called Kalua
    Fender DG5 Dreadnought guitar named Tilly
    Tanglewood Discovery guitar
    Valencia hybrid classical guitar

    My Music Blog

  6. #16
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    Apr 2020
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    8

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    You don't need an amplifier to hear the sound properly and they are often available at a lower price than electric guitars.

  7. #17
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    Mar 2017
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    My friend passed away last year; we met in grade school & hung out together, played music, sports over the next 50+ years. He was was the best guitar, bass, keyboard, singer & drummer of all of my friends.

    His family wanted me to have his guitar - it's a beautiful Taylor NS62CE hybrid. At first I didn't want it cuz I could never play it as well as my friend. Never expected to own a Taylor - will remember my friend every time I play his guitar.

  8. #18
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    Mar 2014
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    Ames, Iowa
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    I know little about classical guitar, but I find the name golpeador interesting in that is a term used in Puerto Rico for a wife beater. Or at least I've heard it in that context. It is also used sometimes for a soccer player who makes a lot of goals. Anyway, if I just herard someone call their guitar a golpeador, I think my first impression would have been a beater guitar. Glad to know that a golpeador is a classical guitar, and not the one you take to the beach.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by gochugogi View Post
    That's why they're called classical guitars!

    They're more classical than not but the colors, sound hole, cutaway, do make them stand out in a very conservative genre. One of my hardcore classical guitar colleagues told me she would be a ashamed to be caught with such guitars (not kidding!).
    I have a friend who lives and breaths classical guitar and when I retired he got me interested in playing the guitar. But I had no idea. I hung out for a week at the bar with him and his classical guitar friends and they talked classical guitar. They were always walking around with their guitars in cases, so my wife had this old Sears and Robuck steel string dreadnought guitar and I dug it out. I showed up at the bar with that thing and I kid you not, I thought that they were going to take me out in the alley, blindfold me, put me up a against the wall, shoot me, and call it justifiable homicide. They did not want to even be in the same bar as that Sears and Robuck guitar. So then I was a bit embarrassed and went looking for a righteous classical guitar. About that same time a series of events resulted in me buying a ukulele instead. That ended my soiree into the world of classical guitar.
    Last edited by Rllink; 04-29-2020 at 04:16 AM.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  10. #20
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    Feb 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    I know little about classical guitar, but I find the name golpeador interesting in that is a term used in Puerto Rico for a wife beater. Or at least I've heard it in that context. It is also used sometimes for a soccer player who makes a lot of goals. Anyway, if I just herard someone call their guitar a golpeador, I think my first impression would have been a beater guitar. Glad to know that a golpeador is a classical guitar, and not the one you take to the beach.
    In the classical and flamenco guitar world, golpeador refers to a pick guard, the type you golpe, i.e., hit or tap for percussive sounds. I call it spankin' da plank." The "wife beater" use I've not heard but then it makes sense as many of us feel as if we were married to the guitar (and it has a feminine shape).

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