Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Ukulele Alternate Chords....whatís this about?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    6

    Default Ukulele Alternate Chords....whatís this about?

    Hello,

    Iím a beginner Ukulele player. Based on the advice of many posts on this site I am practicing with Uncle Rods Bootcamp. Iím making progress working through the practice sheets. Iím improving, but some of the 4 finger chords are a challenge for me. Iíve just now learned that there are alternate chords for many of the chords on the practice sheets. Fm6, Dm7, Cdim as examples. Is there anything wrong with learning alternative finger positions for the chords? Will this somehow be problematic down the road?

    Thanks,
    Les

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Hope, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    859

    Default

    If you intend to play chord melody style, you will want the melody note on the 1st (sometimes 2nd) string, so it helps to know several forms, "inversions" of the same chord.
    A C chord, 0003 or 5433, has the root (C) on the first string.
    If you want an E melody note, you might use 9787 or 0787; or you could get a low E with 000X.
    If you want a G melody note, you might choose 9,7,8,10 or 0,7,8,10; or you could get a low G with 003X or 543X.
    If the melody note is not within the chord, you may want to alter it to CMa7 for a B note or C6 for a Bb or just grab the closest melody note you can find.

    Sometimes you may want a partial chord. Some folks use what they call a Hawaiian D7 2020, which has no root.

    An B7 can be made 4320 or 2322. These both have the same notes and if you're playing in re-entrant, they're in the same octaves, just in a different order. The 4320 makes it easier to move to or from Em 0432, but the 2322 is a moveable chord, so is worth learning.
    Last edited by Jim Yates; 01-25-2020 at 08:07 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,498

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lclaypool20 View Post
    Hello,

    I’m a beginner Ukulele player. Based on the advice of many posts on this site I am practicing with Uncle Rods Bootcamp. I’m making progress working through the practice sheets. I’m improving, but some of the 4 finger chords are a challenge for me. I’ve just now learned that there are alternate chords for many of the chords on the practice sheets. Fm6, Dm7, Cdim as examples. Is there anything wrong with learning alternative finger positions for the chords? Will this somehow be problematic down the road?

    Thanks,
    Les
    Are you talking about alternate fingerings or alternate chords?
    Alternate finger positioning for C chord = using index finger for 0003
    Alternate C chord = 5433

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    278

    Default

    Oh boy!

    HUGE topic, and sometimes a fun rabbit hole to explore, but not yet, k?

    What you need to know for now is that there are usually MANY ways to play the same chord, and sometimes one sounds better, or is easier to get to in a sequence.

    Eventually you’ll probably want to know at least a few of them, like 4447 for e instead of 4442, but for now just learn them as they come up in arrangements, and eventually you’ll start to see the patterns. When you want to dive deep into that, Fretboard Roadmaps is an excellent resource.
    Concert: Lanikai LU-21C (Southcoast MU)
    Soprano: Kala KA-PWS (Southcoast Machete)
    Baritone "Rennaissance Guitar": Kala KA-SBG (C-Linear with Worth BL-LGs currently.)
    Tenor: Kala ATP-CTG (Southcoast LMU-NW
    Tenor "Low G': Kala KA-FMTG (Southcoast LML-NW
    Tenor: Kala SRT-CTG-E (Southcoast LMU-NW
    Baritone "Nui": Pono NS-10 (Worth B-B)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    493

    Default

    This is from Uncle Rod in another thread referring to his Bootcamp:

    "here's a shameless self-promotion plug for my Ukulele Boot Camp (see link in signature below).
    if you are a beginner may I suggest that you skip over the second line of chords in each
    Practice Sheet... for now. They will be a little more difficult to form in the beginning so you
    can skip them until you are ready"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks all for responses. This is helpful.

    Thanks,
    Les

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    951

    Default

    Les,

    I may or mayn't be stepping on people's toes in this thread (I don't know), but I think you should realize that ukulele is a process and not an instance. And in the process you do things in the beginning and do things later on. I think you should learn your beginner chords. These chords are solid. For many people, their interests never outstrip these chords. However, if you are interested in music, then the other options are available further up the neck. But the beginner chords are still key to transitioning to other inversions/voicings of chords. I have found that once I became kick-ass at freting chords in the lower frets, I became more dexterous generally and able to even contemplate trying some more advanced chords up the neck. So my advice is to do due diligence on the beginner chords and then branch out to different chords with different roots when it becomes necessary and natural.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Ripock,

    That makes sense. I will continue to work on those 4 finger chords that trip me up. I'm finding that I can do it, but just not very fast at this point. I'm not discouraged. I enjoy the practice and can see improvement.

    Later,
    Les

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    951

    Default

    That's good. Definitely practice the problems directly, but also work around the problem. I remember when the A-shaped barre chord that we use for B and Bb eluded me. I just avoided it and became better at other things...then when I went back to the Bb major, it just worked; I had amassed enough general experience that the problem solved itself. Same thing with the C-shaped barre chord that we use for the C# major.

    And speaking of barre chords. Some of my most feared 4 finger chords were overcome with barre chords. For example the minor 7 chord that is rooted on the E string (the Fm7, for instance). I barre the top of the shape and only have to worry about fingering the bottom. The same thing applies to diminished 7 chords.

    Lastly, I bested some 4 finger chords by making them 3 finger chords. I do this by dampening a string. However that may not be for you right now because the only thing harder than playing a note, is not playing it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Nakhonratchasima, Thailand
    Posts
    268

    Default

    One should learn and be able to play all chords including barre chords. However, If your hands or fingers are too small that is another thing. Some people have injuries due to accident or old age. I have that problem. There is no other way except to play what you can and learn it well so you sound as good as the person who can play all of the chords that you cannot.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •