Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 52

Thread: The Cost

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    403

    Default

    I'm just a hobbyist builder, but it has been educational reading the comments from those of you that do lutherie for a living. I'm asked from time to time if I plan to sell my instruments. Not deliberately or for a business. If someone offered to buy one, I'd listen to them, but that's as far as I'd go. I gave away 3 ukes this week. Not something I could do if I did this as a business, I think.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
    Posts
    7,509

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Howlett View Post
    ...living from hand to mouth pursuing her dream.
    Dreams are best for nighttime with your eyes closed
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Canada Prairies, brrr ....
    Posts
    1,259

    Default

    I have the greatest respect for all of you who start and make a living off a small business. While I had many high flying "business" ideas, I never had the guts to take the risk and actually try to implement any of them.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
    Posts
    5,539

    Default

    In an earlier business venture that failed .. I was constantly relying on my overdraft to get me by, and in the end my Bank manager took the facility off me and made it into a loan..it took a year to pay it off, it seemed harsh to me at the time but he really did me a favour I went back into working for someone else for a while to pay the loan off. And I didn’t lose my property as many other failed businesses did.
    Last edited by Timbuck; 11-26-2020 at 05:46 AM.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    403

    Default

    To follow up on Merlin's post, I really am clueless about how to run a business. A few years ago, I started an online fine arts photo venture. Registered with my state tax department and all. It failed big time. I sold very few prints. Not because I am lousy at photography, but because I am lousy at promotion and marketing. I've heard of people that do very well getting business just by word of mouth. I am not one of those people. Fortunately I was still employed FT at the time.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    2,655

    Default

    I've been building and selling ukuleles for six years now. Over that time I've made $22,750 dollars. That works out to $3,791.66 cents a year. Obviously no one could live on such an income. However, I never intended to make ukuleles for a living but only to provide enough money to buy wood and tools and maybe some decent wine. I make ukuleles because I enjoy making ukuleles and I am retired and have enough TIME and discretionary income to do so.

    Bottom line is: Don't quit your day job (or night job).

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Brenchley, Kent, England
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Iv'e been self-employed for about three decades now, always mixing different income streams. Musician at the weekend, bookkeeper and now therapist / pastoral carer in the week and a tiny income as a writer in the background. Has worked out well overall.
    Pete Howlett 'Deacon' - low G (That One With The Amazing Back)
    Gold Tone small bodied Tenor resonator - high g
    Kala Tenor resonator - low G

    Also Mark Savoy G melodeon, Andy Norman DG Anglo, Alba & MK whistles, Dave Copley flutes and Jon Swayne bagpipes. Well, keeps me busy.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    403

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    I've been building and selling ukuleles for six years now. Over that time I've made $22,750 dollars. That works out to $3,791.66 cents a year. Obviously no one could live on such an income. However, I never intended to make ukuleles for a living but only to provide enough money to buy wood and tools and maybe some decent wine. I make ukuleles because I enjoy making ukuleles and I am retired and have enough TIME and discretionary income to do so.
    Sequoia, that is amazing to me. I'm recently retired, too, and do this as a hobby. If I was able to sell some of my instruments and flip the money back into the hobby, I'd be delighted. However, I can't seem to stop making stupid mistakes in my building. They don't stop my instruments from being functional, but they are aggravating none the less. If someone asked to buy one of my instruments and they still wanted it after I pointed out the flaws, that's one thing, but I could not in good conscience ask someone to pay me for one, not at my current level of expertise.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Pacific Inland Empire
    Posts
    228

    Default

    I've read that some outfits keep their new people in luthier apprenticeship for as much as eight years. That would be for an 18-21 year-old, up to about 30 years old. By that time they should be journeyman "workers" at the lutherie. How many more years to become Master? It varies considerably; some don't make it that far. How many young people have that kind of patience??? Plus, that's just the technical side of the business. Meanwhile, apprentices would need to be educated on the business side. Dedicated much?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Australia.
    Posts
    243

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tonyturley View Post
    ….However, I can't seem to stop making stupid mistakes in my building. They don't stop my instruments from being functional, but they are aggravating none the less. If someone asked to buy one of my instruments and they still wanted it after I pointed out the flaws, that's one thing, but I could not in good conscience ask someone to pay me for one, not at my current level of expertise.
    As instrument builders, we are obligated to produce a product that is fit for purpose. For the ukulele, this means an instrument that will play in tune, is built to a level of sturdiness that ensures it will not be easily damaged, is finished in a manner that will resist the rigours of handling and hopefully, sounds pleasing as well.
    The reading of reviews, shows that not all manufacturers get these basics right, but as small specialist builders we should, at least, be striving for this, and perhaps quite a bit more.
    A guitar builder of note is reported as saying that “Good lutherie is not so much about building perfectly, but more about being able to hide mistakes perfectly”, and this should be kept in mind by all fledgling builders.
    Don't be overly concerned about making mistakes as long as you are willing to address them, so that they don't become repeatable or habitual.
    The dedicated player is less concerned about cosmetics and perfection, and more about playability and musicality. There are exceptions to this generality, and as most of us know, some people take much delight in pointing out the most trivial and minute cosmetic flaws.
    My advise is to show your instruments to any interested party, let her/him play them, listen to the relevant comments, and re-assess the worth of your builds accordingly ... not everybody is looking for perfection, but nearly everybody is looking for a discount.
    Last edited by bazuku; 01-29-2020 at 03:50 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •