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Thread: Bm major issue

  1. #11
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    Jul 2019
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    lolz

  2. #12
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    Nov 2019
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    My uke teacher told me to play anyway, even if i was missing or muting. He told me from this i would grow familiar with the position of my fingers on the strings and learn to transition to and from this chord. I did as he asked and i started to get it right occasionally. When i got it i would stop and look at my fingers and try to see and feel what i did differently that time. I can do it now, no problems at all. Give yourself permission to sound bad for a while and go for it.
    I am trying the same thing now with f#, with mixed results

  3. #13
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    Feb 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emmjay View Post
    My uke teacher told me to play anyway, even if i was missing or muting. He told me from this i would grow familiar with the position of my fingers on the strings and learn to transition to and from this chord. I did as he asked and i started to get it right occasionally. When i got it i would stop and look at my fingers and try to see and feel what i did differently that time. I can do it now, no problems at all. Give yourself permission to sound bad for a while and go for it.
    I am trying the same thing now with f#, with mixed results
    Is your problem the G string? If so, may I suggest you solve the problem by avoiding it; don't play the G string. You can mute it by having your index finger nudge into it as you're fretting the C string, thereby choking off its sound.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    Is your problem the G string? If so, may I suggest you solve the problem by avoiding it; don't play the G string. You can mute it by having your index finger nudge into it as you're fretting the C string, thereby choking off its sound.
    Honestly sometimes it is sometimes it is not. I seem to be pretty inconsistent with my finger position. I will give it a try though, thank you.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emmjay View Post
    Honestly sometimes it is sometimes it is not. I seem to be pretty inconsistent with my finger position. I will give it a try though, thank you.
    If it is a case of 'sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't' I would take it as an emerging skill, which will get better with practice. Once you manage it, you can move it, like all four finger chords. Keep at it, I would say.

  6. #16
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    Feb 2020
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    I have the same problem and thought the same thing at first. My finger canít keep the A string down and my hands are so tiny that itís hard to reach the G string without laying my finger on more of them.

    Barring the first three stings and muting the G string with the tip of my finger is somewhat easier. But my favorite work around is to put fingers 1,2,3 on C,E,A and mute the G string with my thumb.

    Maybe some day I will build enough strength and flexibility but for now Iím playing for fun and thankfully there are work arounds for many of the chords I thought were impossible.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary52 View Post
    Much good advice has been given, and no one learns to play barre chords without a lot of practice.

    Pressing harder is not the answer; press smarter by positioning your hand to gain some mechanical advantage:
    1. As ripock wrote, "allow the hand to sag toward the ground." Having a strap helps here. If the strap is holding up the neck of the uke, your hand can hang from the neck and gravity increases the force on your barring finger.
    2. Don't put your thumb directly behind the barre. Move it up or down the fretboard so that your hand rotates a bit creating some leverage on the barring finger. This technique also puts the edge of your finger against the strings. The edge of the finger is usually straighter and less fleshy that front surface.

    These techniques are described in these videos:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJEY26RUPzo
    https://www.playukulelebyear.com/3-q...an-ergonomics/
    Excellent videos. I'll pass them on to others. Thanks for posting them.
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
    You can learn by reading, but you donít begin to know until you begin to try to do.

    óLou Churchill, Plane & Pilot Magazine

  8. #18
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    Aug 2017
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    Utah
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    I follow Uncle Rod's advice and substitute (Bm7) 2222 for Bm. Most of the time I don't barre it, just play it as a 4 fingered chord. Barre chords will always be a work in progress for me.
    Last edited by RafterGirl; 03-05-2020 at 01:18 AM.
    My ukulele family.....
    KoAloha Koa concert - circa 2006 (Living Waters)
    aNueNue Moon Bird concert - Spruce & Rosewood - 2018 (Blackwater)
    Blackbird Clara - 2019 (Oasis Bright)
    Cocobolo concert - 2019 (Worth Brown)

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Grand Rapids, MI
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    And once you can make a secure bar chord, youíll spot all Kinds of places where a bar makes your life easier
    Concert: Lanikai LU-21C (Southcoast MU)
    Soprano: Kala KA-PWS (Southcoast Machete)
    Baritone "Rennaissance Guitar": Kala KA-SBG (C-Linear with Worth BL-LGs currently.)
    Tenor: Kala ATP-CTG (Southcoast LMU-NW
    Tenor "Low G': Kala KA-FMTG (Southcoast LML-NW
    Tenor: Kala SRT-CTG-E (Southcoast LMU-NW
    Baritone "Nui": Pono NS-10 (Worth B-B)

  10. #20
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    Dec 2019
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    Pacific Inland Empire
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    It just doesn't seem to be that hard. I've played guitar since 1970, which means the Bb is the same as the F, far more difficult on the guitar...Don't see how this could be so hard to do. Sorry, not much sympathy, ukulele is far less difficult.

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