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Thread: Is this how alternate chords are written in music?

  1. #1

    Default Is this how alternate chords are written in music?

    I'm looking at a song I wanted to play that showed chords written like this:
    C/G. G. D/F#m.
    Are the chords separated by / supposed to be alternates?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    <TL;DR>Ignore the note after the / and just play normal C G and D chords</TL;DR>

    Generally slash chords mean that you play the chord before the slash but with the note after the slash as the bass note. In these cases where the second note is part of the chord it specifies the inversion.

    On a ukulele you usually will just ignore the part after the slash since with only four strings it can be difficult to play specific inversions with out jumping all around the fretboard, especially if you have high-G. On a low-G your standard open C chord is the C/G inversion (the open 4th string is G) and you'll need to go up to the 11th fret to get the F# on the 4th string.

    Unless it's part of a walking bass line it probably won't matter.

    If you have a bass player they'll play note after the slash. If not, get a bass player

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcy View Post
    <TL;DR>Ignore the note after the / and just play normal C G and D chords</TL;DR>

    Generally slash chords mean that you play the chord before the slash but with the note after the slash as the bass note. In these cases where the second note is part of the chord it specifies the inversion.

    On a ukulele you usually will just ignore the part after the slash since with only four strings it can be difficult to play specific inversions with out jumping all around the fretboard, especially if you have high-G. On a low-G your standard open C chord is the C/G inversion (the open 4th string is G) and you'll need to go up to the 11th fret to get the F# on the 4th string.

    Unless it's part of a walking bass line it probably won't matter.

    If you have a bass player they'll play note after the slash. If not, get a bass player
    Thanks so much!

  4. #4
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    D/F#m might be what's called a polychord, and if so the closest we can get to playing it on the uke is by playing Dmaj7 (an enharmonic equivalent). 2224 is the most common way to play Dmaj7, but if you wanna stay true to the polychord voicing, 7999 and 7690 are also possible.
    I play fingerstyle (っ✿◕‿◕)っ♪♬
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain-janeway View Post
    I don't see the F#m in question, so the discussion about that would not apply. I assume that these are guitar chords where as it was indicated you use the note past the slash for bass. So on a guitar for the d/F# one would wrap the tumb around and play f# on the E-string instead of the open D string, and for C/G one would play the G on the E-string instead of default C on the A string. For ukes it is safe to ignore this and just play the chords before the slash, i.e. just plain C, D, and G chords.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by merlin666 View Post
    I don't see the F#m in question, so the discussion about that would not apply. I assume that these are guitar chords where as it was indicated you use the note past the slash for bass. So on a guitar for the d/F# one would wrap the tumb around and play f# on the E-string instead of the open D string, and for C/G one would play the G on the E-string instead of default C on the A string. For ukes it is safe to ignore this and just play the chords before the slash, i.e. just plain C, D, and G chords.

    Sorry F#. Yes it was a typo

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Most of the chord sheets I play from with my church band have similar notations. Two chords with the slash in between. The guitars folks can play it, but as the others above have said, I just play the first chord. However, every once in awhile, the second chord sounds better in a given situation. When that happens, I circle the better sounding chord on the sheet to remind myself. I have no previous background in music theory, just know what sounds good.

    The capo 4 notation on your song is a dead giveaway that it’s a chord sheet aimed at guitars. I’m pretty “capo adverse” so I transpose whenever I can. We’ve added a bass guitar to our band, so he & I use the same transposed chords.
    My ukulele family.....
    KoAloha Koa concert - circa 2006 (Living Waters)
    aNueNue Moon Bird concert - Spruce & Rosewood - 2018 (Blackwater)
    Blackbird Clara - 2019 (Oasis Bright)
    Cocobolo concert - 2019 (Worth Brown)

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